Jazz festival artists – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 11:49:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kmjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-53-120x120.png Jazz festival artists – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ 32 32 NH7 Weekender: Music festival that will welcome 40 international and local artists https://kmjazz.com/nh7-weekender-music-festival-that-will-welcome-40-international-and-local-artists/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 11:42:41 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/nh7-weekender-music-festival-that-will-welcome-40-international-and-local-artists/ Popular international and local bands including ‘The Lumineers’, ‘Dirty Loops’, ‘Bloodywood’ and ‘The F16’s’ will perform at the upcoming multi-genre music festival, ‘BACARDI NH7 Weekender’ in Pune from 25 november. The music festival, to be held at Mahalaxmi Lawns, Pune, will host performances from 40 global and local artists across a mix of genres spanning […]]]>

Popular international and local bands including ‘The Lumineers’, ‘Dirty Loops’, ‘Bloodywood’ and ‘The F16’s’ will perform at the upcoming multi-genre music festival, ‘BACARDI NH7 Weekender’ in Pune from 25 november.

The music festival, to be held at Mahalaxmi Lawns, Pune, will host performances from 40 global and local artists across a mix of genres spanning hip hop, metal, rock, electronic and fusion.

Along with American folk rock band ‘The Lumineers’ and Swedish jazz band ‘Dirty Loops’, the festival will also feature ‘Berklee Indian Ensemble’, which will showcase a new sound inspired by the full spectrum of Indian music, with influences ranging from hip-hop to Middle Eastern nuances.

Others in the local category include “Dappest + adL”, pop duo “Parekh and Singh” and lyric rapper HanuMankind.

“Showcasing some of the world’s most talented artists from multiple genres and backgrounds, NH7 will once again allow consumers to do what moves them while experiencing India’s happiest music festival,” said Sameeksha Uniyal , Brand Manager, BACARDÍ India and South East Asia.

“We look forward to providing our audience with a space to enjoy, explore and discover music like never before, as they are the backbone that makes our festival a thrilling success,” she added.

The artist lineup also includes Tejas, ‘VelvetMeetsATimeTraveller’, ‘Kraken’, ‘Gutslit’, ‘Trees For Toothpicks’, ‘Pacifist’, ‘Dohnraj & The Peculiars’, Sanjeeta Bhattacharya, Rudy Mukta and ‘Wild Wild Women’, among others.

The festival, an intellectual property (IP) of NODWIN Gaming – the gaming and eSports arm of Nazara Technologies – and presented by BACARDÍ Experiences, will end on November 27.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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BBQueer Fest returns to spotlight queer artists of color https://kmjazz.com/bbqueer-fest-returns-to-spotlight-queer-artists-of-color/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 02:24:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/bbqueer-fest-returns-to-spotlight-queer-artists-of-color/ Be the first to know about the latest entertainment, arts and culture news. Sign up to get Wallace story alerts delivered straight to your phone. And find Wallace’s recent work here. For the second year in a row, Santa Cruz is set to be the stage for artistic expression by queer people of color at […]]]>

Be the first to know about the latest entertainment, arts and culture news. Sign up to get Wallace story alerts delivered straight to your phone. And find Wallace’s recent work here.

For the second year in a row, Santa Cruz is set to be the stage for artistic expression by queer people of color at BBQueer Fest, which will take place in various venues starting Thursday.

From workshops to performances, the roster of events is designed to elevate the often marginalized work of queer artists of color (“BBQueer” has nothing to do with grilled meats; the “BB” stands for “Black and Brown.”)

In fact, the festival kicks off in Watsonville, with “A Little Bit of Salsa!”, a dance workshop by Alex Santana and Valentina Velasquez, with a workshop at 6:30 p.m. and an open dance an hour later in the newly opened Watsonville. Center for the Arts, 375 Main St., directly across from Watsonville Plaza.

On Friday, the focus shifts to downtown Santa Cruz with an ambitious and diverse performance on the grounds of Santa Cruz City Hall titled “Poética.” The free event will feature a number of live dance performances with live music and spoken word.

“It’s a full spectrum night of the arts,” said curator and event director Angela Chambers. The festival’s flagship event took place in 2021 at Motion Pacific, but aside from a change in venue, the spirit and purpose of the event is the same, said Chambers, who also works as program manager. and teaching artist at Tannery World Dance. & Cultural Center.

Gregory Dawson from dawsondancesf is one of the featured artists on BBQueer.

Gregory Dawson from dawsondancesf is one of the featured artists on BBQueer.

“It’s the same idea, but it’s not the same composition,” she said. “We have a featured artist that we bring back to the tannery on a fairly regular basis, and that’s Gregory Dawson of (based in San Francisco) dawsondancesf.”

Dawson will perform with a number of other Santa Cruz and Bay Area artists, including Mak Nova, Will Kahn, Summer Red, Kat Factor, Maya Daodu, Alexandra Mannings and the Xochipilli Dance Company.

“And we’ll also have some young dancers from Santa Cruz who identify as black, brown, or gay performing,” Chambers said, “so it’s a really nice lineup of artists.”

Saturday is BBQueer Fest’s only paid event, “The Body Erotic Reveal BurlyQ Show”. The event at Motion Pacific is a burlesque show — like the Sin Sisters troupe that performs locally several times a year — but with a queer focus, featuring a dozen performers, local and out of town.

Also on Saturday, a series of afternoon dance workshops, at the Tannery and Motion Pacific, a movement workshop featuring Gregory Dawson, technique and burlesque style featuring Ray Gunn, and a BurlyQ” featuring Alotta Boutté.

On Sunday, the workshops continue with a dance workshop by Luna Bey and a discussion of anti-racist ideas and practices called “Showing Up for BBQueer” for white people. The workshops will continue next week with performer Isaiah Esquire presenting a workshop for playing in heels on Tuesday and advanced jazz on Wednesday.

All of BBQueer’s events are free, with the exception of “The Body Erotic Reveal BurlyQ Show”, and all require registration. To register for one of the events or workshops, or to find out more, visit here.

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Here’s What Rock + Metal Artists Think About Pantera’s Return https://kmjazz.com/heres-what-rock-metal-artists-think-about-panteras-return/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 19:02:59 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/heres-what-rock-metal-artists-think-about-panteras-return/ What do rock and metal musicians really think of Pantera’s comeback? At this year’s Louder Than Life festival, we asked a group of artists their thoughts on the historic comeback of the surviving Cowboys From Hell. The reaction to Zakk Wylde and Charlie Benante filling the role of the late Dimebag Darrell and Vinnie Paul […]]]>

What do rock and metal musicians really think of Pantera’s comeback? At this year’s Louder Than Life festival, we asked a group of artists their thoughts on the historic comeback of the surviving Cowboys From Hell.

The reaction to Zakk Wylde and Charlie Benante filling the role of the late Dimebag Darrell and Vinnie Paul was a move that was met with unanimous praise from our collection of musicians. “It’ll be awesome and I think Charlie and Zakk will do the honors…I don’t think the Abbott brothers would want it any other way,” Mastodon drummer Brann Dailor said. “If they had to hand-pick the people who would play their roles, it’s the guys.”

In fact, the only musician who didn’t like the choice of Zakk Wylde on guitar was GWAR vocalist Blothar the Berzerker. “I heard they hired some fancy pants…Zakk Wylde?” Good grief, come on. It’ll just do a bunch of pinch harmonics,” Blothar bellowed.

The only point of contention that existed for some of the young artists we spoke to was some of the unfortunate comments Philip Anselmo made about race a few times. Although Anselmo did penance for these comments, some members of Wargasm and Dropout Kings still view Anselmo as problematic.

“It’s tough because I don’t really agree with Phil,” said Sam Matlock of Wargasm. “I’m going to go see them because I think it’s an education for me. I think you have to earn your stripes and seeing Pantera live is part of that. I just wish Phil would shut his mouth.

Check out what fellow members of Sevendust, Tetrarch, Crown the Empire and more had to say about Pantera’s return in the video below.

Rockers react to Pantera’s return

The best metal album of each year since 1970

See Loudwire’s Picks for Best Metal Album of Every Year Since 1970

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Luminarts Cultural Arts Foundation Celebrates 10 Years of Funding Artists and Changing Lives https://kmjazz.com/luminarts-cultural-arts-foundation-celebrates-10-years-of-funding-artists-and-changing-lives/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 17:18:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/luminarts-cultural-arts-foundation-celebrates-10-years-of-funding-artists-and-changing-lives/ In 2014, RS Deeren, 26, was an aspiring writer attending Columbia College, living in Ravenswood, and so poor he was stealing cans of tuna from his roommate to cook for dinner when he was notified that he had won a scholarship from the Luminarts. Cultural Foundation. “I was kind of a cliché,” Deeren told the […]]]>

In 2014, RS Deeren, 26, was an aspiring writer attending Columbia College, living in Ravenswood, and so poor he was stealing cans of tuna from his roommate to cook for dinner when he was notified that he had won a scholarship from the Luminarts. Cultural Foundation.

“I was kind of a cliché,” Deeren told the Chicago Sun-Times. “It was the first time anyone other than a school said, ‘You are a writer, we believe in you,’ and the money was very attractive at the time.”

Deeren’s story is perhaps one of the most dramatic of artists who have won Luminarts grants in the past decade, but several spoke to the Sun-Times about how the foundation helped them financially and provided opportunities that led to the fulfillment of their careers.

On October 1, the Luminarts Cultural Foundation will celebrate 10 years of funding and supporting Chicago-based artists with a dinner at the Arts Club of Chicago. Along the way, more than $2 million has been paid out to more than 200 fellows, along with countless networking opportunities that many have taken advantage of, according to executive director Jason Kalajainen.

Chicago-based cellist Alexander Hersh said he was a young musician with limited experience and a lot of sass when Luminarts first supported him.

“I had an idea for a chamber music festival called Nexus Chamber Music when I was 24, and they went there,” said Hersh, who won a scholarship in 2016 and later got a project grant. for its music festival a year later.

“They believed in me and believed in so many other artists and it’s so empowering and amazing. Thanks to this initial grant, we are now in our fifth year [and returned to] Ravina and [the classical music incubator] Guarneri Hall with the festival this year,” Hersh said.

While the foundation has been around since 1949, originally founded as the Union League Civic & Arts Foundation (CAF), the Luminarts Cultural Foundation was established by members of the Union League Club of Chicago as a separate non-profit organization. non-profit. For years the foundation has supported artists with one-time monetary awards, but it wasn’t until 10 years ago that the organization decided to focus its financial and other resources to help boost the career of a artist, said Kalajainen.

Luminarts generally receives between 400 and 500 applicants per year for 20 scholarships, and the three criteria are that the applicant must be between 18 and 30 years old at the time of application; they must live within 150 miles of downtown Chicago when they apply, and they must be enrolled in or have graduated from a degree program, Kalajainen said.

Fellows are judged by professionals in fields such as visual arts, jazz and classical music, and creative writing. In addition, thanks to a collaboration with the Joffrey Ballet, one ballet scholarship holder is awarded per year. Likewise, a collaboration with the School of the Institute of Art allows a fashion designer, and a collaboration with the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art allows an architect to be selected per year, a said Kalajainen. Fellows receive a check for an amount ranging from $5,000 to $15,000 and can also apply for additional project grants.

Multidisciplinary artist and filmmaker, Aimy Tien was a 2014 Luminarts grantee in literary creation.

Tyler Pasciak LaRivière/Sun-Times

Over the past decade, Luminarts has awarded more than 200 fellows, and a map of the geographic reach of the group’s awards resembles an aerial map of cities served, with routes from Chicago to all of Europe, Asia , the Middle East and Australia. .

Luminarts is funded by a government endowment, private donations, fundraisers and a historic relationship with the Union League Club of Chicago – whose Kalajainen members have likened to “arts venture capitalists”.

“They are certainly donors, but they also invest money in these incredibly talented young people because they want their wonderful art to be in the museums they go to and their books to be in the libraries they go to” , Kalajainen said.

But more than money, Luminarts provides networking and professional development opportunities, which has helped fellow countryman Aimy Tien, a 30-year-old writer and filmmaker.

“It’s been eight years since I got my scholarship and they still contact me. They see other ways to support us with project grants and also host cocktail parties where we can meet other collaborators,” said Tien, who received a creative writing grant in 2014. She added that in because of her scholarship, she became writer-in-residence at the Union League Club library for a year and received a project grant for a film she made called “To the Body”.

For Deeren, who grew up in rural Michigan before attending Columbia College, the trust Luminarts placed in him gave him the confidence to take on other projects.

“Luminarts was that organization that said, ‘We see you and we want to promote you.’ It gave me a ton of confidence, especially as a small-town guy moving to Chicago,” Deeren said.

Deeren, who now lives in Tennessee and is a writing professor at Austin Peay State University, said wryly that her first collection of short stories would soon be published by Wayne State University Press.

“In this collection is the story I submitted to the Luminarts competition that won me the scholarship, so it’s really come full circle,” Deeren said. Additionally, like Tien, through Luminarts, he was awarded the Union League Club Library Writer-in-Residence two years after receiving his fellowship.

“It gave me the space and the time to start my first novel, which I’m in the process of editing,” Deeren said.

While Luminarts’ plans continue to favor Chicago artists for years to come, Tien said they are helping more than artists selected as scholarship recipients.

“We often forget that there are entire teams behind the art, even solo. So even though a scholarship supported me, it ends up affecting a lot of additional artists. Luminarts has been a nexus of broader artistic impact that cannot be immediately seen by our individual grants.

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For a year, the New York artist space will transform its basement into a cutting-edge performance venue https://kmjazz.com/for-a-year-the-new-york-artist-space-will-transform-its-basement-into-a-cutting-edge-performance-venue/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:53:37 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/for-a-year-the-new-york-artist-space-will-transform-its-basement-into-a-cutting-edge-performance-venue/ Artists Space, a New York City non-profit organization that pioneered Romare Bearden, Zaha Hadid and countless others, announced that starting in October, they are transforming the basement of their last location into a “a highly responsive, form-shifting place for living and enduring art in all its forms. The new space will aim in particular to […]]]>

Artists Space, a New York City non-profit organization that pioneered Romare Bearden, Zaha Hadid and countless others, announced that starting in October, they are transforming the basement of their last location into a “a highly responsive, form-shifting place for living and enduring art in all its forms.

The new space will aim in particular to show “nascent, underappreciated and genre-defying performances”, the institution said in a press release. “Artists will receive substantial institutional support.”

Although performance is a fundamental part of Artists Space’s history, this will be their very first space dedicated to such a goal in nearly 50 years of existence. And the plan is to keep the space flexible so the institution can be nimble in its programming.

“There is no fixed scene or viewing position,” director Jay Sanders told Artnet News. “There’s a lot of ability to transform it into space.” Artists Space has already upgraded the room’s acoustics and installed a new sound system, but kept the lighting and seating open “to honor the way artists work.”

A view of the new performance space in the basement.

Some programs, brought together through studio visits and conversations between Sanders, curator Danielle A. Jackson (formerly of MoMA) and their network, will be one-time engagements. Others will be ongoing series. “The list is a really interesting mix of artists we love, but also conservative thinkers we love too,” Jackson told Artnet News. Almost all events will be free to the public, which may miss performances.

“There aren’t a lot of venues in midtown Manhattan,” Sanders said of the city’s dwindling performance spaces. “We think a lot about our region and being an anchor for these art forms.”

Artists Space has had six locations during its existence, all in midtown Manhattan. His first long-term lease was at 155 Wooster Street until 1977, but perhaps most famously he was at 38 Greene Street throughout the 1990s.

The institution recently operated from a small gallery on White Street, but “it was our vision to take on a larger space that would allow us to do a multiplicity of things at once,” Sanders said. “The effort was to have a major new home downtown.”

Multimedia performance duo SCRAAATCH will be in a four-day residency at Artists Space.

That house now sits at 11 Cortlandt Alley, which Artists Space structured “to anticipate a truly diverse layering of different art forms co-existing across both floors,” the institution said in a statement.

Artist Space opened in its new location in 2019, using its two galleries on the ground floor primarily for traditional exhibitions, while experimenting in the basement. “We’ve really tapped into what this space will do,” Jackson said, “using it to learn what we can do with performance.”

Their decision to go semi-permanent and commit to a full year of performance programming was a no-brainer, Jackson added. The pandemic and rising cost of living have shuttered DIY locations across the city, reducing opportunities for artists and fans. Among the spaces to close was Max Fish, which once hosted the Abasement concert series. Since 2015, Abasement has held monthly shows with four performances and a guest DJ, mixing artists and bands from all genres, including improv, minimalism and noise.

True to its “truly underground” roots, Artists Space will now host Abasement on the first Monday of every month this fall.

Avant-garde jazz guitarist and ascetic Tisziji Muñoz will perform at Artists Space.

So far, Artists Space also has four standalone engagements scheduled through December. As time is also a kind of space, each carries a unique duration: a one-night show by avant-garde jazz guitarist and ascetic Tisziji Muñoz; a two-day sound poetry festival co-hosted with Los Angeles-based composer and label executive Sean McCann; a four-day residency by multimedia performance duo SCRAAATCH; and three nights of movement by keyon gaskin, “one of the most mercurial choreographers and dancers working today”.

Artists Space will also continue its collaboration with the Segue Reading Series, “an indispensable platform for radical poetry and writing”, curated by a changing line-up of poet-curators. Attendance will cost a nominal fee, under the terms of Segue’s grant, and will take place every Saturday beginning at 5 p.m. on October 1.

The institution sees the basement space as “a gathering place for the community and a forum for discussion,” and it hopes to leave things open for “artists themselves to define the terms of their work and how they determine its public presentation”. The results of this year-long experiment will also inform future decisions about how Artists Space uses its funding resources.

“Our audience is made up of many artists, so it’s a dynamic exchange,” Sanders said.

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Buffy Sainte-Marie talks about cancer, Indigenous artists and the monarchy before the performance in British Columbia https://kmjazz.com/buffy-sainte-marie-talks-about-cancer-indigenous-artists-and-the-monarchy-before-the-performance-in-british-columbia/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/buffy-sainte-marie-talks-about-cancer-indigenous-artists-and-the-monarchy-before-the-performance-in-british-columbia/ Cree singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie has had a rollercoaster year, from having shows canceled due to illness to premiering a documentary about her life, music and activism at the Festival Toronto Film International. Today, she’s in British Columbia to perform at the Come Toward The Fire festival at the University of British Columbia’s Chan Center for […]]]>

Cree singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie has had a rollercoaster year, from having shows canceled due to illness to premiering a documentary about her life, music and activism at the Festival Toronto Film International.

Today, she’s in British Columbia to perform at the Come Toward The Fire festival at the University of British Columbia’s Chan Center for the Performing Arts — a new concert celebrating Indigenous talent.

Sainte-Marie spoke with CBC’s Gloria Macarenko On the coast before his performance.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

First of all, how are you?

I’m doing really well, you know, during COVID I got sick with everyone and not only did I get COVID – it didn’t bother me too much – but I also got cancer.

I had to cancel some concerts and I’m really happy that the Chan Center concert is going on. We had to cancel others just because of the schedule. I spent three nights in the Denver airport, I was dropped by Air Canada, another time it was dropped by WestJet and it kind of hurt my health to hang around an airport so much, so I canceled a lot of concerts.

But now I’m back for this one and after this I’m gonna stay home and write and have a good life for a little while.

I’m really sorry to hear about cancer. Are you treating yourself for this?

I’m everywhere. I just walked through it. It was a pretty serious cancer. I had an operation. It seemed uncertain for a while because you never know. But I’m totally back. My health has completely returned.

When we talk about this spotlight on Indigenous creativity right now — music, books, movies — how do you think where it’s going?

I’m so excited that the public and the art business, show business, television, media and everything, I’m so glad that they’ve changed, that they’re maturing to receive our artists because our artists are great for a long time, but they couldn’t get any traction anywhere.

It’s really hard for a young artist coming from any background not to have contacts, to be continually treated like a first act or someone who has to wait in the wings, because a lot of our artists are matured for a while, and yet they haven’t had the record deals, they haven’t had the media exposure. But it’s coming. It’s coming.

You’ve been writing and singing about really hard truths for a long, long time: cultural genocide, displacement, oppression. So when you hear Indigenous artists today echoing some of these themes, what comes to mind?

What I like the most is that they don’t just write about hard times like me, they also write love songs.

They write jazz, they write hip-hop, they write songs for fun, they write orchestral music, they write all kinds of stuff, like I’ve been lucky enough to do in my career.

So a lot of people will nail you in the face and say, “Oh, she must just sing about Indians and about Indian issues,” and that’s how it was seen in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. people were unprepared for our diversity and talent. There were good writers, there were good actors around. They couldn’t be hired, so you didn’t hear them.

But now it’s a little different, and I’m so glad that day is coming. That doesn’t mean it’s easy for us now, but it’s much better to be accurately represented.

What has crossed your mind since the announcement of the death of Queen Elizabeth II?

I certainly offer my condolences to his family and loved ones. I think she was a lovely woman, although I think the monarchy is just shit and stupid. It’s a dumb, outdated thing.

We can sit down and criticize ourselves, or we can celebrate the good things we see in others.

It’s interesting how his funeral and passing affect the media.

She gave me two medals during my career. She was nice to me personally, but when it comes to the pecking order, the whole European monarchy, the dictatorships, just the bad leadership, which has been historic all over Europe, I feel sorry for the Europeans who were tossed through these institutions long before they knew of the existence of the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

I don’t spend my emotional energy being angry at people.

What other projects are you working on?

Madison Thomas, who’s half native and half European, she made a great little documentary, and I’m really glad it wasn’t me who decided what was left and what was left because I had a real big life.

There was an earlier documentary by Joan Prowse called Buffy Sainte-Marie: a multimedia life. But in 90 minutes, you can’t say the same. And so Madison was able to cover a little more territory.

There are many things that no documentary has covered. There is nothing about romantic relationships. There’s very little about the Cradleboard Teaching Project or some of the other big things in my life that haven’t been covered. I don’t know if there will be a third documentary, but it could be action packed.

On the coast2:30 p.m.Buffy Sainte-Marie set to perform at ‘Come Toward The Fire’ festival at UBC

Cree singer-songwriter and Canadian music icon Buffy Sainte-Marie sat down to talk about her cancer diagnosis, difficult travels, the monarchy and more ahead of her September 18 show in Columbia. British

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World Music Showcase Mundial Montreal 2022 announces more artists https://kmjazz.com/world-music-showcase-mundial-montreal-2022-announces-more-artists/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 06:35:04 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/world-music-showcase-mundial-montreal-2022-announces-more-artists/ International Showcase Mundial Montreal has announced another round of world music acts to perform November 15-18, 2022 in Montreal, Canada. After the unveiling of the first 8 artists in July, including groove&, Helsinki-Cotonou Ensemble, Le Diable à Cinq, Lengaïa Salsa Brava, Moneka Arabic Jazz, Nohe & Sus Santos, Polky and Symbio, festival organizers have announced […]]]>

International Showcase Mundial Montreal has announced another round of world music acts to perform November 15-18, 2022 in Montreal, Canada.

After the unveiling of the first 8 artists in July, including groove&, Helsinki-Cotonou Ensemble, Le Diable à Cinq, Lengaïa Salsa Brava, Moneka Arabic Jazz, Nohe & Sus Santos, Polky and Symbio, festival organizers have announced 11 additional names.

The second batch of artists from Mundial Montreal is made up of Afrikana Soul Sister, a trio that aims to bring people together by creatively combining sounds influenced by their West African and North American traditions.

Indigenous experimental artist Ánnámáret (Nordic bridges) creates dreamscapes by fusing traditional Sámi vocal music with the ancient sound of jouhikko, the Finnish bowed lyre.

AySay (Nordic bridges)fuses the Danish and Kurdish/Turkish culture of singer Luna Ersahin.

Bab L’Bluz is part of Morocco’s Nayda youth movement and sings freedom songs in the Darija dialect.

SUMMER offers a very current and dynamic vision of traditional Quebec music.

JINJ is a pioneer of Armobeat, fusing Armenian folk with urban sounds.

The Ukrainian Band of Newfoundland, Kubasonics (Newfoundland and Labrador Music) combine spicy high-flying musicality with offbeat humor.

Maria and the gang play folk music from northeast Brazil, with influences ranging from blues to arabesque.

Pierre Kwenders is a Congolese Canadian musician, songwriter and DJ who weaves stories from memories of the past, sketches of his hometown and reflections on the future.

PIQSIQ is the musical project of Inuk duo Inuksuk Mackay and Tiffany Kuliktana Ayalik where they fuse throat singing with new technologies to create haunting soundscapes.

Streams have been named “the best kept secret in Canadian funk” by La Presse, this group of accomplished musicians is well known on the soul/funk scene across the Atlantic.

More on www.mundialmontreal.com

Author: World Music Central News Department

World Music News from the Editors of World Music Central

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Eight Powerful World Premieres and 101 Artists Honored at Port Fairy Spring Music Festival https://kmjazz.com/eight-powerful-world-premieres-and-101-artists-honored-at-port-fairy-spring-music-festival/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 04:16:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/eight-powerful-world-premieres-and-101-artists-honored-at-port-fairy-spring-music-festival/ Eight Powerful World Premieres and 101 Artists Featured at Port Fairy Spring Music Festival October 14-16, 2022, Port Fairy, Victoria Hundred and one. This is the number of artists who will make history for three days at this year’s Port Fairy Spring Music Festival (PFSMF) in what will be a joyous and groundbreaking return after […]]]>

Eight Powerful World Premieres and 101 Artists Featured at Port Fairy Spring Music Festival

October 14-16, 2022, Port Fairy, Victoria

Hundred and one. This is the number of artists who will make history for three days at this year’s Port Fairy Spring Music Festival (PFSMF) in what will be a joyous and groundbreaking return after two years silenced by COVID 19. of the Festival is REGENERATION – to reconnect, recharge and regenerate.

From celebrated works of the past to inspiring classics of the future, the PFSMF returns to the must-attend calendar for music lovers and arts adventurers with EIGHT WORLD PREMIEREs and 36 world-class events performed by local, visiting, emerging and established musicians, together in the one of the most magical places on the planet.

Of the 101 artists at this year’s Festival, 38 are returning and 63 are making their PFSMF debut, including the internationally acclaimed Goldner String Quartet.

Led by Artistic Directors Monica Curro and Stefan Cassomenos, the PFSMF begins with Kawai’s Opening Gala featuring composer Yuin Brenda Gifford’s Miriwa which paints a joyful picture of heaven and its relationship to land, as well as the intimate version for chamber orchestra by Gustav Mahler. brilliant Fourth Symphony.

Titled REGATHERING, the concert will be conducted by the esteemed Fabian Russell and will feature rising soprano superstar Rebecca Rashleigh and an impeccable ensemble of instrumentalists.

“Having opened with Miriwa, Brenda Gifford’s renewed vocal offering to the dhurga language, alongside Mahler’s magnificent Symphony No. 4, the PFSMF celebrates eight world premieres.” (Full list below.) “Anne Norman reimagines the sounds of the Port Fairy wetlands, Brenda Gifford invokes Barra Barra, the timeless sea, James Ledger presents the dazzling virtuosity of James Crabb, Bryony Marks reconstructs images from our uncomfortable past , Thomas Green’s multifaceted prism shines through three new works, and Dermot Tutty nurtures the voices of the future with his oratorio, co-written with the children of Port Fairy,” said co-artistic director Monica Curro.

“We are delighted to welcome the Goldner String Quartet to Port Fairy for the first time, and the return of beloved festival favorites – The composers pay tribute to our festival patron, Lauris Elms, as well as tango maestro Piazzolla. Anna Goldsworthy makes a triumphant return with Brahms, Pejačević and Haydn, Adelaide’s ensemble Various People in Invocations will reconjure their intimate world, and festival icon Stephen McIntyre hosts a feast of Schumann and Schubert,” she said. declared.

“We reveal a treasure trove of youthful brilliance – the prodigal Wattleseed Ensemble, the prodigious Partridge String Quartet, the bodacious Black Square String Quartet, rising superstars Louis Hurley and Rebecca Rashleigh, and our own local ‘Regenerators’. The Stiletto Sisters and the Cairo Club Orchestra will raise the roof of the drill hall, and Port Fairy legends Anna-Lee Robertson and Leah Oswin will share their gift of songwriting.

“Our sweetest joy to return in 2022 is to reunite with friends from the South West and beyond, at two special events – a new collaboration with the Find Your Voice Collective affirming humanity through creativity; and our epic closing gala, once again bringing together a splendor of talent and expertise from local instrumentalists and choristers alongside esteemed soloists and Maestro Michael Dahlenburg, in an ode to our relentless human capacity for regeneration.

This year will also see The Sensorium, an innovative multimedia installation unveiled and, with the ringing of the Federation bells, a new Festival venue will be welcomed to St Brigid’s Crossley.

The Port Fairy Spring Music Festival was established in 1990 by the late British/Australian composer Michael Easton ARAM and pianist Len Vorster and has been held as an annual regional music festival ever since.

Over 32 music-filled years, artistic directors have included Marco van Pagee, Len Vorster, Erich Fackert, Stephen McIntyre, Anna Goldsworthy and Iain Grandage. Continuing their legacy, current Artistic Directors, Monica Curro and Stefan Cassomenos, in 2022 deliver a feast of classical and contemporary ensemble music in new and collaborative programming, combining and celebrating the talents of much-loved established artists with the best of young new and emerging Australians. performers and composers.

In addition to an incredible chamber music program, there is also cabaret, jazz, orchestral and choral music, opera, film, interdisciplinary artistic collaboration, accessible performances and free events in a program of 31 presentations over three days. School concerts, masterclasses, pre-concert talks, artist talks and conversations, and art exhibits enhance the appreciation and involvement of Festival patrons and the community.

WORLD PREMIERE AT PFSMF 2022

“Brogga Dawn” by Anne Norman – Saturday October 15 at 3:30 p.m.

Anne Norman’s new work, for shakuhachi and 12-voice choir, incorporates field recordings of birds from the Western District wetlands, in shimmering surround sound.

“Barra Barra” by Brenda Gifford – Sunday October 16 at 2 p.m.

Brenda Gifford is a composer and a proud Yuin woman whose culture is the basis of her artistic practice, and her new work “Barra Barra” for string quintet, commissioned by the Port Fairy Spring Music Festival, evokes the transcendental power of ageless sea.

“Talk” by James Ledger – Sunday October 16 at 10 a.m.

“Talk” by ARIA-winning composer James Ledger is written for the classical accordion and is commissioned by virtuoso accordionist James Crabb, who has commissioned and premiered many new works for the classical accordion.

“Mothers’ Suite Sweet Mothers” by Thomas Green – Sunday, October 16 at 10 a.m.

Commissioned by ABC’s Fresh Start Fund, ‘Mothers’ Suite Sweet Mothers’ for violin and piano is a work in five movements, each movement representing a stage in the life of mother and child, from the earliest tender moments with the infant until the moment when the child, having grown up, breaks the bonds of childhood and when the mother must let go of them.

“The Sensorium” – music by Thomas Green, visual work co-curated by Gareth Collison and Monica Curro – Sunday October 16 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Composer and sound magician Thomas Green’s many soundscapes are symbiotically paired with images by dynamic visual artists from south-west Victoria, in an immersive installation co-curated by the legendary art guru multi-faceted Gareth Colliton, alongside Festival co-director Monica Curro. .

“Australian Fair? Volume I” by Bryony Marks – Sunday October 16 at 11.30am

Presented alongside a montage of Australian national archive footage of film and sound from ‘ordinary’ Australian life spanning the 1920s to the 1960s, ‘Australia Fair? Volume I” is written for string quartet and highlights how notions of Australian identity and gender expectations have fluctuated over the decades – Marks’ masterful music simultaneously serving the images and reaching far beyond, in non-verbal comments.

“Guardian Spirit” by Thomas Green – Saturday October 15 at 7:45 p.m.

Written for electronics, percussion and string quartet, “Guardian Spirit” is a very unique continuous ensemble, with high-energy sections interspersed with dreamlike, refined moments – the music developing organically from delicate, featuring what in a parallel universe might be called classic sounds, in an exuberant and constantly surprising hybrid of electronic dance music and percussive art music.

“And the Sweetness Worked its Charm” – composed in collaboration by Dermot Tutty with schoolchildren from Port Fairy – Sunday October 16 at 3:30 p.m.

Commissioned by Port Fairy Spring Music Festival for the 2022 Closing Gala: ‘Regeneration’ brings together instrumentalists and backing vocalists from across South West Victoria alongside Melbourne musicians and magnificent soloists. This new work for tenor, choir and orchestra is composed in collaboration by Dermot Tutty with school children from Port Fairy, who join the Port Fairy Spring Music Festival Orchestra and Chorus to sing the world premiere of their new piece.

Port Fairy Spring Music Festival

October 14-16, Port Fairy, Victoria

Concert tickets, Festival passes and all information at PORTFAIRYSPRINGFEST.COM. AU

The Port Fairy Spring Music Festival honors the Gunditjmara people, the traditional owners of the regions that now encompass Warrnambool, Port Fairy, Woolsthorpe and Portland, and honors their elders past and present.

Port Fairy Spring Music Festival is proudly supported by the Victorian Government through Creative Victoria.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the authors.

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Levitt AMP Concerts Brings Jazz A Triple List of Jazz Artists to Trenton https://kmjazz.com/levitt-amp-concerts-brings-jazz-a-triple-list-of-jazz-artists-to-trenton/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 07:36:02 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/levitt-amp-concerts-brings-jazz-a-triple-list-of-jazz-artists-to-trenton/ There was jazz, applause, singing and laughter in Mill Hill Park during the week as three jazz bands played to the cheers of the crowd. Levitt AMP headliner Alex Parchment brought out the best throughout his performance. “Oh man, this beautiful festival. I’m so glad to be here at the Amp Trenton Music Series. It’s […]]]>

There was jazz, applause, singing and laughter in Mill Hill Park during the week as three jazz bands played to the cheers of the crowd.

Levitt AMP headliner Alex Parchment brought out the best throughout his performance. “Oh man, this beautiful festival. I’m so glad to be here at the Amp Trenton Music Series. It’s been a blessing, and I’m just happy to be able to share music with these beautiful people,” Parchment said.

The evening began with James White and his band playing contemporary jazz which included classics and new R&B songs. James E. White has over 30 years of experience as a jazz, blues, gospel and R&B musician. Some of his career highlights include his appearance on “Showtime at the Apollo” and his performance with jazz artists Jimmy Scott and Leo Johnson.

On stage with him was Bernon Crowe, Jr, bassist, jamming on his third set of the day. “I’ve been with James White for about six years… He’s also classically trained. He plays all genres of music, from gospel to jazz to funk, pop, rock, r&b. You name it,” Rowe said.

As lawn chairs spread out in Mill Hill Park, Trenton resident Eboni Hicks and her mother, Diane Carmichael, sat and listened to music as she cradled her newborn baby.

“Being in a town with my mom is the most important thing to me. It created memories with her and the new baby in the family,” Hicks said.

Carmichael adds that she wanted to enjoy the night with her daughter at a free event. “I like jazz music; I like that it’s free. Few things you could get these days are free. It’s wonderful that they let you out and you don’t have to pay a dime,” Carmichael said.

After White came Jackie Greggs, a 25-year music industry veteran who played from Louisiana to New York. In 2011, Greggs toured Kyoto, Japan for five weeks, performing at the prestigious Selected Repos Nightclub. She is riding on her success after releasing her second single, “Old Friend”, in 20221, a tribute song to one of her musical influences, the late Phyllis Hyman.

“I love music, and I love to sing and perform. So any opportunity I have to do that, I take it,” Greggs said. She grew up with R&B and gospel music. Later, deciding to pursue music as a career, she learned jazz and combined all three to do her styles and remixes.Although she spent time in the studio, her favorite part of her career was being on stage.

“I just appreciate anyone who stops what they’re doing and goes out to listen to live music…because you know what people might be at home on Facebook, but instead they’ve brought their chairs garden, they came out and they listened, and they clapped, and they danced…I want to go back and do it again if I could. It’s just electrifying to me,” Greggs said.

Those who wanted to dance danced; well, others chose to indulge in other relaxation at night. Trenton resident Cynthia McMullen sat in the shade of the trees and listened to music. “I went out because I like jazz; I brought a few cocktails and just chilled. I love it,” McMullen said.

The evening ended with Parchment, who recorded as part of the traditional group, the Alex Parchment Quintet. “So I play contemporary jazz, but it has elements of folk, r&b, gospel, and some covers,” Parchment said.

Parchment is part of an experimental soul-funk-hip-hop-jazz band called AP Chemistry and has worked as a sideman with artists such as Christian McBride, David Sanborn, Chick Corea and others. As darkness descended on Mill Hill, cheers, laughter and applause came for Parchment, and he explained that he had never had such an experience before.

“It was fire on stage. It was crazy…it was just an exhilarating experience. And I’m so lucky to have been able to be on that stage. It was fun. know, everyone played beautifully,” Parchment said.

He continues: “We were very well received. And so I’m just a blessing to be able to be here. And so I hope to come back, but honestly, I felt like this stage. I wish I could feel what I feel at every gig.

This weekend is the last weekend of the Levitt AMP concert series. Rounding out the incredible lineup for the Levitt AMP Trenton 2022 music series is Grammy-nominated Ariacne Trujillo Duran on September 17.

The Levitt AMP Trenton Music Series is supported in part by the Mortimer & Mimi Levitt Foundation, which partners with cities and towns across America to activate underutilized public spaces through the power of free live music, thus creating a welcoming and inclusive destination. Local sponsors include The African American Cultural Collaborative, NJM Insurance Company, as well as support from the City of Trenton, Mercer County Park Commission, Greater Trenton and TrentonDaily.

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Dance artists, some emerging and some established, excel at the Montclair outdoor festival https://kmjazz.com/dance-artists-some-emerging-and-some-established-excel-at-the-montclair-outdoor-festival/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 21:20:19 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/dance-artists-some-emerging-and-some-established-excel-at-the-montclair-outdoor-festival/ PHOTOS BY TONY TURNER Esteban Santamaria and Namhui Kim dance the late Nai-Ni Chen’s “crosscurrent” at Dance on the Lawn in Montclair. The annual Dance on the Lawn festival in Montclair marks the start of the fall dance season, but the carefree spirit of summer lingers on at this sunny outdoor event. This year’s free […]]]>

PHOTOS BY TONY TURNER

Esteban Santamaria and Namhui Kim dance the late Nai-Ni Chen’s “crosscurrent” at Dance on the Lawn in Montclair.

The annual Dance on the Lawn festival in Montclair marks the start of the fall dance season, but the carefree spirit of summer lingers on at this sunny outdoor event. This year’s free show took place on Saturday, September 10 in front of the Montclair Public Library, and visitors who were drawn to the Montclair Jazz Festival had a great time.

On a day when all of Montclair seemed to be celebrating, Dance on the Lawn offered a spirited lineup of professionals and students, with each group introduced by Nasha Thomas, the elegant emcee. Bright and hopeful, the teenagers warmed up the crowd. Keep working, kids! And never take your eyes off the pros.

Thanks to a legacy from the defunct 10 Hairy Legs company, Dance on the Lawn is able to commission new work from emerging artists. This year’s “emerging New Jersey choreographer” was Will A. Ervin Jr., whose four dancers opened the program’s professional segment with a piece called “Cycle.” Rushing across the stage in choppy transitions, the dancers left behind one of their own, isolated and perhaps forgotten. Raising their hands upward in a broken gesture, they rubbed their fingers together, looking bewildered by the texture of the air. Hung together in a tangled group, they circled and struggled. Ervin explained that his play was inspired by the suffering of a man wrongfully imprisoned for a murder he did not commit.

Maurice Chestnut at Dance on the Lawn.

Maurice Chestnut is a tap dancing sensation and one of the most amazing performers on the scene today. At Dance on the Lawn, he performed a solo titled “Interlude in Rhythm” on a square platform just 4 feet by 4 feet, and boundless inventive streams of music poured out from that small space. Adding to the impression of magic, this artist tapped with the speed and delicacy of a hummingbird. Holding himself back, he deliberately put three steps on the ground, then the next moment he allowed himself to levitate on a sound cushion. By inviting us to clap our hands to fill in the missing beats, he changed the rhythm in a playful way and the public loved being teased.

“A Measure of Quarantine” by Maxine Steinman places two dancers, Elijah Carter and Amir Baldwin, in an intimate space where Satie’s “Gymnopédies” and the gentle synchronies and manipulations of the men create a warm atmosphere. Eventually, Carter backed away, however, and watched Baldwin dance alone, swinging his arms, tiptoeing, and bending over. When Baldwin ran a hand over his forehead, he seemed to take on a personal resolution.

By contrast, the late Nai-Ni Chen’s “Crosscurrent” duet was a passionate affair in which amorous caresses alternated with sudden jerks, pirouettes and leaps. Namhui Kim and Esteban Santamaria were the fiery partners, finally pressing their palms together in a gesture of magnetic attraction.

Courtney J. Lewis performs “ER” at Dance on the Lawn.

Another duet, Mikaela Morisato’s “Euphonic Connection,” displayed a less statuesque style, with Liana Zhen-ai Kleinman and Ragin Smith shaking, kicking, and somersaulting throughout the dance. A wild energy possessed these two, until the music abruptly stopped, releasing them from their compulsions.

Dancer Courtney J. Lewis capped off the program with the solo “ER”, choreographed by Abdel R. Salaam. Dressed in a white lab coat, Lewis was the mistress of a battle-scarred table that stood in for a hospital stretcher as she rode and handled it. Responding to a series of urges, Lewis threw himself desperately into action, kicking and convulsing, pounding the table with his fists and skating on it. When the table tipped over with Lewis still clinging to it, the whole world seemed to tilt at crazy angles.

For some people, every Saturday evening is like this, and we wish these care professionals the strength to continue.

To learn more about this annual event, visit danceonthelawn.org.

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