Jazz festival highlights – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 17:55:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://kmjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-53-120x120.png Jazz festival highlights – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ 32 32 Detroit Jazz Festival: highlights from Saturday performances https://kmjazz.com/detroit-jazz-festival-highlights-from-saturday-performances/ https://kmjazz.com/detroit-jazz-festival-highlights-from-saturday-performances/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/detroit-jazz-festival-highlights-from-saturday-performances/ The first full day of the completely virtual Detroit Jazz Festival was a breathtaking journey through many forms of jazz, 13 hours of almost non-stop music that drew viewers from around the world. At various times of the day and night, members of the public who watched the Facebook and YouTube live streams at home […]]]>

The first full day of the completely virtual Detroit Jazz Festival was a breathtaking journey through many forms of jazz, 13 hours of almost non-stop music that drew viewers from around the world.

At various times of the day and night, members of the public who watched the Facebook and YouTube live streams at home recorded themselves from all time zones in the United States, Europe and as far away. than Melbourne, Australia.

Following: “Singing is spiritual for me,” says Gregory Porter, due Sunday night at the Detroit Jazz Festival

Following: Highlights from Friday performances at the Detroit Jazz Festival

The day started with Festival Foundation Collegiate Combo Competition 2021 winner L Stop from New York University. Remember the names of these young men – pianist Carlin Lee, bassist Warren Louie, drummer Anton Kot, alto saxophonist Tiger Diep and tenor saxophonist Cole Palensky – because they all go far, and Detroit is the one. one of the first musical scenes to recognize it. .


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Detroit Jazz Festival: highlights from Friday performances https://kmjazz.com/detroit-jazz-festival-highlights-from-friday-performances/ https://kmjazz.com/detroit-jazz-festival-highlights-from-friday-performances/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/detroit-jazz-festival-highlights-from-friday-performances/ A few minor and early technical issues did not hold back the Friday night launch of the Detroit Jazz Festival 2021. The annual Labor Day weekend event, which runs through Monday night, has been converted from a in-person format to a fully virtual format two weeks ago due to the rising number of COVID-19, and […]]]>

A few minor and early technical issues did not hold back the Friday night launch of the Detroit Jazz Festival 2021. The annual Labor Day weekend event, which runs through Monday night, has been converted from a in-person format to a fully virtual format two weeks ago due to the rising number of COVID-19, and the performers were broadcast live from sound stages built in downtown Detroit Marriott.

Impeccable sound and crisp video, along with concert-quality staging and lighting, proved festival artistic director Chris Collins’ assurance that “no expense has been spared” to deliver the best experience. possible for spectators around the world.

The evening started with artist-in-residence Dee Dee Bridgewater, who devotes a significant portion of her time on stage this weekend raising young women in the art form. Wearing stiletto heels and a sun hat – a lovely nod to the typically outdoor setting of the event – she presented The Woodshed Network, a quintet joined by two singers, and the connection between the ladies was evident throughout. . Bridgewater beamed with pride as she introduced every player and song, and the band members affectionately called her “Mama Dee Dee”.


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Jazz festival shines a light on Saint Lucia’s tourist harmony in 2020 https://kmjazz.com/jazz-festival-shines-a-light-on-saint-lucias-tourist-harmony-in-2020/ https://kmjazz.com/jazz-festival-shines-a-light-on-saint-lucias-tourist-harmony-in-2020/#respond Fri, 17 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/jazz-festival-shines-a-light-on-saint-lucias-tourist-harmony-in-2020/ The upcoming 2020 St. Lucia Jazz Festival, produced in collaboration with prestigious New York-based organization Jazz at Lincoln Center, marks the start of the Caribbean Island’s festival season and also highlights what’s on the way. to become a record travel time for the destination. Scheduled for May 7-9, 2020, the festival is now in its […]]]>

The upcoming 2020 St. Lucia Jazz Festival, produced in collaboration with prestigious New York-based organization Jazz at Lincoln Center, marks the start of the Caribbean Island’s festival season and also highlights what’s on the way. to become a record travel time for the destination.

Scheduled for May 7-9, 2020, the festival is now in its 28th year and will feature leading modern jazz artists performing at venues across St. Lucia including The Ramp on Rodney Bay and Gros Islet Park. .

THE ADVERTISEMENT

This year’s festival continues an initiative launched last year – the first in which organizers from the Saint Lucia Tourist Board (SLTB) have teamed up with Jazz at Lincoln Center – to reinvigorate the event with a comeback to authentic jazz performances. Saint Lucia was one of several Caribbean “jazz” concert series which in recent years have featured mainly acts of popular music.

Instead, this year’s Festival is highlighted by jazz legend Chick Corea, who will perform with Carlitos Del Puerto and Marcus Gilmore. A celebration of legendary hard bop trumpeter Roy Hargrove by Willie Jones III and Renée Neufville is also planned. Alphonso Horne and Ruben Fox’s Gotham Kings, London Brass with Theon Cross and Mark Kavuma and Maher Beauroy are also set to perform.

Citing the “successful” inaugural year of the partnership between the Festival de Saint Lucia and Jazz at Lincoln Center, Dominic Fedee, Minister of Tourism of Saint Lucia, said that the Festival’s return to the emphasis on music jazz had revitalized the event and helped generate a wave of visitors in 2019.

“Saint Lucia is once again the number one jazz festival in the Caribbean.” – Dominic Fedee, Minister of Tourism of Saint Lucia.

“After [nearly] In 30 years the festival has grown so big that we have started to experiment with it a lot, ”said Fedee. “We started to add rap, soca and R&B [music.] When we had our first encounter with Jazz at Lincoln Center, they said, ‘Hey, this isn’t jazz. You have to go back to basics and be a lot more authentic.

As a result, “Saint Lucia has once again become the number one jazz festival in the Caribbean,” Fedee said. “There has been a lot of passion, a lot of hard work and a lot of joy to make sure we tell people through music and through this festival that Saint Lucia is the most idyllic island destination in the world.”

In addition to jazz performances, the 2020 Festival will feature ‘Artists In Education’ initiatives including masterclasses, professional development and live collaborations with St. Lucia School of Music students and local jazz artists. .

“Jazz, like most music in the African diaspora, has the power to bring people of all ages together,” said Cat Henry, vice president of concerts and tours for Jazz at Lincoln Center.

“It breaks down barriers and teaches tolerance and is an invitation to share genuine and contagious joy,” said Henry. “We celebrate our collaboration with the Saint Lucia Tourist Board. We have something for everyone from the serious jazz fan to the first-time island visitor looking for a deep good time.

The 2020 St. Lucia Jazz Festival will coincide with an increase in visitor arrivals for the Caribbean nation.

“We’re at the top right now,” Fedee said. “This year, for the first time in our registration of tourism statistics, we reported more than 400,000 [overnight, land-based] Arrivals. Americans have made a significant contribution to our growth; this market has experienced strong growth of nine and a half percent, ”he said.

“When we bring together hotel guests, cruise stays and yacht visitors, we reach 1.2 million visitors,” Fedee said in 2019, which is a 5% year-over-year increase. other compared to 2018.

Island developments

Saint Lucia is also expanding its hotel base as arrivals increase, Fedee said. All-inclusive operator AM Resorts will launch a Zoetry resort as well as new Dreams and Secrets properties within two years, while Hyatt Hotels & Resorts is planning a 780-room property project in St. Lucia.

“Over the next 10 years, we are expected to have 3,000 hotel rooms in Saint Lucia to significantly expand our room inventory, bringing tremendous value to our destination,” Fedee said.

Saint Lucia is also making progress in the development of a major cruise port. “We are preparing to sign a memorandum of understanding with Carnival Cruise Lines and Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines to build the island’s second largest cruise port in the south, near the airport,” Fedee said.

“This is to strengthen the home porterage activity. We make sure that the cruise port and the airport are part of the same complex; it will be one of the most amazing facilities you will see in the Caribbean, ”he said.

Attractive events

SLTB is also working to refocus island tourism experiences on authentic local experiences. “We’re very, very proud of what’s in Saint Lucia,” Fedee said. “We make sure that we have reinforced the experiences, to make sure that when people come, they can go bamboo rafting, that they can take a carnival tour. [and] also have a new rum distillery experience, ”he said.

“All this is planned for the complete renewal of the tourist product of Saint Lucia. We make sure to perpetuate our architecture and our village tourism, so that when you come, you see the authenticity.


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At the Newport Jazz Festival, the highlights were everywhere, and that’s a good thing https://kmjazz.com/at-the-newport-jazz-festival-the-highlights-were-everywhere-and-thats-a-good-thing/ https://kmjazz.com/at-the-newport-jazz-festival-the-highlights-were-everywhere-and-thats-a-good-thing/#respond Sun, 04 Aug 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/at-the-newport-jazz-festival-the-highlights-were-everywhere-and-thats-a-good-thing/ NEWPORT, RI – It’s in the nature of multi-story music festivals that you always miss something. Spend a full 60 minute set with one act and you miss most or all three. So think of this as a snapshot series of 20 performances of the Newport Jazz Festival on Saturday afternoon, the second of three […]]]>

NEWPORT, RI – It’s in the nature of multi-story music festivals that you always miss something. Spend a full 60 minute set with one act and you miss most or all three. So think of this as a snapshot series of 20 performances of the Newport Jazz Festival on Saturday afternoon, the second of three days of music.

Now celebrating its 65th anniversary, the festival is as diverse and deeply representative as it has ever been, unleashed in part by founding producer George Wein’s decision in 2010 to take the non-profit event, with a strong educational component (the sponsoring company is Natixis investment managers).

So there was the old guard – pianist Herbie Hancock, 79; bassist Ron Carter, 82; and singer Sheila Jordan, 90 (a guest star of The Royal Bopsters vocal trio). At the forefront were the first performances in Newport by vibraphonist Joel Ross in his twenties and drummer Makaya McCraven, 35. )

Stylistic choices were omnipresent: the nervous grooves of the McCraven band; vigorous hard bop from drummer Ralph Peterson’s group (with an elegant and moving Bill Pierce on tenor saxophone); Ethiopian interpretation of keyboardist Hailu Mergia on American jazz, afropop and reggae; Ghost Note’s LOUD hard funk; American jazz from violinist Jenny Scheinman and drummer Allison Miller’s group Parlor Game.

The stars have come from the singers: multilingual Mallorcan singer Buika, with her raw Iberian whine (and a surprising 6/8 rolling version of Billie Holiday’s standard “Don’t Explain”); Dianne Reeves (with her jazz-ballad interpretation of Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams”); and Dee Dee Bridgewater, who offered a short lesson on civil rights, with a reminder of “Why?” Little Rock Nine and Staple Singers. (Am I treated so badly). “

Other memorable moments included Parlor Game’s take on Miller’s “Top Shelf” (“about the ridiculousness of getting drunk on expensive alcohol”) and the dreamy sweet melody of “Sleep Rider” by Scheinman. Vibist Ross (who duplicated McCraven) and his band followed an appealing slipped groove with a slow, boiling ballad. Hancock, in a trio with bassist (and Newport Artistic Director) Christian McBride and drummer Vinnie Colaiuta, offered an expansive version of “Footprints” from compatriot Wayne Shorter. In an intimate duet with saxophonist Ravi Coltrane, pianist David Virelles released gnarled and detailed tracks in chords as soft as clouds.

Kamasi Washington (left) with his band at the Newport Jazz Festival.Nic Antaya for the Boston Globe

I’m no fan of the bland predictability of headliner Kamasi Washington. But the saxophonist / conductor has become something of a sensation since releasing his triple CD “The Epic” in 2015. It was hard to fault the serious elevation of his melodies and commentary on stage one day. where news of the carnage in El Paso appeared on people’s cell phones.

For me, the highlight of the afternoon was perhaps the quietest: Carter, in a trio with guitarist Russell Malone and pianist Donald Vega, paying homage to the late partner of bassist Jim Hall’s duo, with “Candle Light ”by Carter and Dimitri Tiomkin- Standard by Ned Washington“ Wild Is the Wind ”. In his lines to Malone, Carter was a dance partner, both supportive and free. In the August heat, Carter wore a white seersucker jacket and tie with a casual pocket square. It doesn’t get any cooler than that.

Newport Jazz Festival

At Fort Adams State Park, Newport, RI, Saturday


Jon Garelick can be contacted at jon.garelick@globe.com. Follow him on twitter @jgerelick.

An earlier version included an incorrect part of the name Natixis Investment Managers.



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South Beach Jazz Festival spotlights artists with disabilities https://kmjazz.com/south-beach-jazz-festival-spotlights-artists-with-disabilities/ https://kmjazz.com/south-beach-jazz-festival-spotlights-artists-with-disabilities/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/south-beach-jazz-festival-spotlights-artists-with-disabilities/ The South Beach Jazz Festival’s mission is personal to drummer and Jonathan Joseph, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2016. JANOS MURANYI A galaxy of stars, a range of styles, free and paid events scattered across Miami Beach, an educational opportunity – these might be enough for most music festivals, but not for the […]]]>

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The South Beach Jazz Festival’s mission is personal to drummer and Jonathan Joseph, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2016.

A galaxy of stars, a range of styles, free and paid events scattered across Miami Beach, an educational opportunity – these might be enough for most music festivals, but not for the South Beach Jazz Festival.

“Our mission is to show the capabilities of people with disabilities,” said festival founder R. David New. “Historically and today, people with disabilities have surpassed the highest standards for success in all fields and the stigma around them is something I would like to break down.”

The first weekend of 2019 marks the third edition of the festival. Performers include greats such as Grammy-winning singer Dee Dee Bridgewater and pianist Marcus Roberts, who is blind. The region’s favorite violinist and singer, Nicole Yarling, will introduce her student musicians. Renowned flautist Nestor Torres is due to give a master class. Amidst the variety, however, is a constant.

“It’s critical that at least one person in each performing group has a direct connection to a disability,” New said. “With this premise, we aim for the best of the best and do our due diligence to find those who have this shared experience. It is not that difficult to find disabilities because statistically 20% of the population falls into this category.

DeeDee.jpg
Grammy-winning singer Dee Dee Bridgewater will perform at the 2019 South Beach Jazz Festival.

New joined the group years ago when a rare disease left him blind, deaf and paralyzed from the waist down. He regained his ability to walk and hear and became an advocate for people with disabilities, including through his nonprofit Power Access. He presents the festival, whose theme is “From handicap to serendipity”.

“Disabilities are such a challenge and struggle for so many people and I wanted people to know that from these challenges beautiful music and talented individuals could evolve, bringing inspiration and pleasure to others,” New said.

The festival’s mission is personal for the drummer and Jonathan Joseph. He recalls being intrigued when Kimberly Chmura, whose KCC Productions helped New find artists for the festival, approached him with the concept.

“She was asking me if I knew anyone who had been ill or had a disability or any of those things,” Joseph said. “It turns out that I was diagnosed with cancer in February 2016.”

Joseph had prostate cancer. He didn’t share the news with many people. But the Miami Beach native decided the festival would be a good time to change that. “I thought this would be a wonderful cancer awareness opportunity.

“With prostate cancer in men, a lot of men don’t like to talk about it because of what it could potentially mean,” Joseph said. “But now the medical field is so advanced that if you catch it early it won’t impact your life for more than four or five months.”

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Pianist Marcus Roberts will perform at the 2019 South Beach Jazz Festival.

In Joseph’s case, a combination of surgery and nerve-preserving exercises helped prevent the dreaded complications of incontinence and sexual problems.

“But the thing is, you have to do the exercises,” he said. “For me it was a bit like training. I compared it to practicing my instrument. For hours every day, I worked these muscle groups.

Joseph was unsure of how he could incorporate cancer awareness into his band’s performance Weather Underground on Sunday January 6. But he was sure the band would offer the audience a chance to “hear good music and listen to the basics of jazz”.

Most of the shows, including Joseph’s, will be free.

“I always intended that a jazz festival would be something for the whole community,” New said. “I wanted there to be a palpable feeling on the streets and throughout the city of music for residents and visitors. Free events are just as important as paid ones.

ArtburstMiami.com is a non-profit source for news on theater, dance, music, film and the performing arts.

If you are going to

The South Beach Jazz Festival takes place from Friday January 4 through Sunday January 6 at various locations around Miami Beach.

Performers include Dee Dee Bridgewater, Marcus Roberts, Alex Weitz, Maria Rivas, Jonathan Joseph, Leesa Richards, Brian Lynch, Bobby Thomas, Nestor Torres and Nicole Yarling. Most events are free.

Tickets to see Bridgewater and Roberts at the Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd., Are $ 40 to $ 60; a jazz brunch with the Alex Weitz ensemble at Miami Beach Woman’s Club, 2401 Pine Tree Dr., costs $ 65. More information is available at southbeachjazzfest.com.

This story was originally published January 3, 2019 9:27 a.m.


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Your essential guide to this weekend’s Cork Jazz Festival highlights https://kmjazz.com/your-essential-guide-to-this-weekends-cork-jazz-festival-highlights/ https://kmjazz.com/your-essential-guide-to-this-weekends-cork-jazz-festival-highlights/#respond Sat, 27 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/your-essential-guide-to-this-weekends-cork-jazz-festival-highlights/ Musical options abound at the newly expanded festival. O’Driscolls selects some of the highlights from Saturday and Sunday. SATURDAY Hypnotic Brass Ensemble Cyprus Avenue, Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. The group of brothers play two first concerts in the Oliver Plunkett Street hall, with reduced prices for those under 16. Anna Gourari and Zsofia Boros […]]]>

Musical options abound at the newly expanded festival. O’Driscolls selects some of the highlights from Saturday and Sunday.

SATURDAY

Hypnotic Brass Ensemble

Cyprus Avenue, Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m.

The group of brothers play two first concerts in the Oliver Plunkett Street hall, with reduced prices for those under 16.

Anna Gourari and Zsofia Boros

Triskel, 1 p.m.

The legendary ECM label took over the Triskel for much of the weekend, with the Christchurch venue being a perfect setting for playing music that often has at least a foothold in the classical world. This afternoon concert features Anna Gourari and Zsófia Boros in a program of solo and duo works specially designed for the ECM weekend.

TS Monk Quartet

Everyman, 2:30 p.m.

It must be a mixed blessing in the music world to be known as “the son of Thelonius Monk”, but the multi-talented drummer himself is highly respected. In addition to playing drums in his father’s quartet in the 1970s, TS also performed with Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter.

This decently looking double afternoon program also features the Bansangu Orchestra, a London-based ensemble.

Pontius Pilate and the nailers

An Brog, 5 p.m.

The popular ska cover group performs tunes from bands such as The Specials, The Beat and The Clash in concerts on Saturdays and Sundays.

River Lee Hotel

One of the many places offering free music throughout the weekend.

Laura mvula

Town Hall, 8 p.m.

The British singer is headlining one of the many major concerts at Town Hall, a new venue for the Guinness Cork Jazz Festival. Born in Birmingham, Mvula has performed in church choirs and the influence of gospel has been evident throughout her career. His big breakthrough came in 2013 with Sing to the Moon, a debut album that was nominated for the Mercury Prize, and produced the hit single “Green Garden”. She has performed at Electric Picnic and Dublin before, but this will be Mvula’s first concert in Cork.

Wyvern lingo

Live at St Luke’s, 8 p.m.

One of the festival’s non-jazz gigs, the melodious Wicklow trio seem to have found their place with the r’n’b turn of their debut album.

China Moses / Pablo Ziegler Trio

Everyman, 8 p.m.

Another impressive double bill that will draw jazz fans to MacCurtain Street Hall. China Moses is following in the footsteps of her mother, Dee Dee Bridgewater, who performed at the same venue last year. The 40-year-old Californian is a powerful, soul and R&B singer and her production has included original material as well as covers of some of the classics. His group in Cork will include the highly regarded British pianist Ashley Henry.

Pablo Zeigler, on the other hand, promises the tantalizing mix of styles that has been dubbed “nuevo tango”. Basically he takes the tango from his native Argentina, and infuses it with jazz and other influences. It’s been a year for Ziegler, who landed his second Grammy in January when Jazz Tango won the award for Best Latin Jazz Album.

Kristjan Randalu / Dino Saluzzi

Triskel Christchurch, 8 p.m.

Another double ECM bill. Of Estonian origin, Kristjan Randalu grew up in Germany and initially trained in classical music before turning to jazz after hearing the album Chick Coreas Inside Out. He will be joined in Cork by American guitarist Ben Monder and Finnish drummer Markku Ounaskari.

Argentinian bandoneon player Dino Saluzzi made a strong impression when he performed at the Cork festival in 2013 and will certainly attract some of the people who were lucky enough to see this concert.

A world-class musician, Saluzzi is famous for changing the traditional tango sounds of his native country, and his backing band is a family affair, with Dino’s brother, son and nephew.

Paul Dunlea

Green Room, Opera, 11:45 p.m.

Cork trombonist Paul Dunlea is the festival’s first artist-in-residence, and among his appearances this weekend is this late-night concert with his quintet.

All Tvvins

Opera, midnight

Part of the festival’s eclectic non-jazz offering, for many revelers, the Dublin pop duo will be a perfect way to end the night.

SUNDAY

Linley Hamilton Set

Music school, 2 p.m.

The Belfast-born trumpeter is headlining a program that also includes Frank Vignola’s Hot Jazz Guitar Trio.

Jazz on the square

Place Emmet, 1 p.m.-6 p.m.

Throughout the weekend, there will be afternoon free jazz in the square next to the Opera. Wrap yourself well!

Trio of rolls

Triskel, 2:30 p.m.

This young jazz-rock group from Leeds has already been nominated for the Mercury Prize and praised by Gilles Peterson. Their energetic sounds are sure to make a lively Sunday afternoon at the Triskel.

Nnenna Freelon Trio

Everyman, 2:30 p.m.

With six Grammy nominations under her belt, the Massachusetts-born singer has also branched out into theater and also had a residency in Las Vegas in honor of Ray Charles. For this double afternoon program, she will be preceded by saxophonist Donny McCaslin, member of the Maria Schneider Orchestra who also performed on David Bowie’s Blackstar album.

The Metropole Hotel

The MacCurtain Street Hotel was where it all started in 1978, and it still draws large crowds for free daytime concerts and late-night jazz tickets throughout the weekend.

Maria Schneider Orchestra

Town Hall, 8 p.m.

His Grammy Awards include one for a collaboration with David Bowie, and his orchestra is made up of a collection of brilliant musicians. “It’s not just about how well soloists can perform, and they can; they really have to wear the composition, ”explains the American composer.

“The job of the musicians is to create continuity, drama, expression and character, to bring the story to life, so that the audience really feels what I was feeling when I was writing the piece.

Tord Gustavsen / Kit Downes

Triskel Christchurch, 8 p.m.

A delightful double bill as part of the ECM Weekend includes the added bonus of Kit Downes playing on the Triskel pipe organ.

Tord Gustavsen is another man who enjoys tapping into sacred music, combining aspects of Norwegian hymns with cutting edge jazz. He brings a new trio to Triskel.

Stanley clarke

Everyman, 8 p.m.

The legendary bassist brings his distinctive playing style and fusion sounds to Cork for the first time. One of the most anticipated concerts of the weekend.

Nubiyan Twist and Blue Lab Beats

Dalí 10:30 p.m.

At times in recent years, the Cork Festival has probably not paid enough attention to some of the genre fusion acts that have emerged from the UK club scene. Fortunately, this is a gap that has been nicely filled this year. It has the potential to be one of the more enjoyable gigs of the festival, especially if clubbing and dancing is more your bag than sit-down jazz. Nubiyan Twist mixes its jazzy brass section with genres such as soul, afrobeat and hip-hop. Ideal for a late night boogie.

Blue Lab Beats, meanwhile, offers an interpretation of ‘jazztronica’ halfway around the world from their remix work for Dua Lipa and Rag’n’Bone Man.

Jenny greene

Cork Opera House, midnight

Be warned that this is a DJ set, rather than the full orchestral accompaniment Greene has brought to Marquee and other venues. However, it will feature a number of special guests, while the visuals will be provided by local outfit Generic People. The Sunday show is already sold out, but it also plays at 7 p.m. on Monday.

HEROES OF THE HOMETOWN

BRIAN DEAD

Saturday, Cork Opera House, 7 p.m.

The Skibbereen native established his reputation as the Irish King of Soul in 2016 with his album Non-Fiction. It gave birth to his catchy hit “Clap Both My Hands”, as well as other beauty pieces such as “Call My Name”. Deady’s return to Leeside comes on the back of longtime player Black Diamond, recorded in a cave house in Spain and released in September.

There’s a little more country in there than before, but long-term fans will still be happy.

TALOS

Sunday, Cork Opera House, 7 p.m.

Eoin French, aka Talos, is another Corkman who makes an impression beyond his hometown. Earlier this week, his band performed at Brixton Academy in London in support of publishers, as part of a steady rise since the release of their album Wild Alee last year. In November, the former architect takes the road back to the United States. Expectations are already building his next second album, which will be released soon via BMG.


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Highlights of the Umbrian Jazz Festival | New York Amsterdam News: The New Dark Sight https://kmjazz.com/highlights-of-the-umbrian-jazz-festival-new-york-amsterdam-news-the-new-dark-sight/ https://kmjazz.com/highlights-of-the-umbrian-jazz-festival-new-york-amsterdam-news-the-new-dark-sight/#respond Thu, 02 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/highlights-of-the-umbrian-jazz-festival-new-york-amsterdam-news-the-new-dark-sight/ Covering the Umbrian Jazz Festival was a somewhat surreal experience. Strolling around Perugia’s old town, watching live music while strolling through historic sites such as the Cathedral, the Etruscan well (dating from the 3rd century) and the Palazzo Sorbello house-museum, a palace dating from the late 16th century which was bought in 1780 by the […]]]>

Covering the Umbrian Jazz Festival was a somewhat surreal experience. Strolling around Perugia’s old town, watching live music while strolling through historic sites such as the Cathedral, the Etruscan well (dating from the 3rd century) and the Palazzo Sorbello house-museum, a palace dating from the late 16th century which was bought in 1780 by the Marquis Bourbon di Sorbello.

The constant dilemma was whether to stop for ice cream, pizza, pasta, or Italian beer. No no. There will be time later. Right now, jazz is in the air and screams my name, so head to Jazz Goes to the Museum for Dan Kinzelman’s “Ghost” with multi-instrumentalists Mirco Rubegni on trumpet, horn and snare; Manuele Morbichini on alto saxophone; Rossano Emili on baritone saxophone and bass clarinet; and Kinzelman on flute, clarinet and tenor saxophone.

Like with a ghost, you didn’t see what was to come. They sounded like a chamber music quartet. Playing all of the original tunes (from Kinzelman), they started out in a classic area that turned into a flow of intuitive improvisation that continued to flow with more intensity. Yes, avant-garde lives. Lester Bowie and Eric Dolphy would be delighted.

New York’s favorite Texan son Roy Hargrove and his quintet performed at the Round Midnight concert at the Teatro Morlacchi. Despite the late hour, the room was packed. His band included alto saxophonist Justin Robinson, pianist Tadataka Unno, bassist Ameen Saleen and drummer Quincy Phillips.

Hargrove, never one for categorization, has traversed traditions from jazz to R&B to hip-hop beats. His arrangement of “Bring It on Home to Me” by Sam Cooke was jerky. Hargrove was in rare form as he danced and sang to the tunes “Never Let Me Go” and “Soothe Me”. During his bugle solos on ballads like “I’m Glad There Is You”, we don’t know whether to cry or sigh. His proficient group was a high rising force throughout.

Who would have thought that the Younger Take 6, who hosted the first a cappella group in 1980 while attending Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama, would still be going strong.

For this festival, the sextet paid tribute to one of their mentors Al Jarreau. They said that, aside from Jarreau’s advice, he took them on their first tour in 1989. They opened with his hit “We’re in This World Together”. It was the vocal trumpet on Miles Davis’ “Seven Steps to Heaven”. Sometimes the sextet would turn into a duo, solo or trio and move around to play various instruments.

The members of Take 6 are Claude McKnight, Mark Kibble, David Thomas, Alvin Chea, Joey Kibble and Christian Dentley. As a reminder, they harmonized on the word “Hallelujah”. Molto bene! A single word in harmony for six voices. Their performance was a spirited sermon, enriched with power, hope and courage. As they noted, “This is dedicated to Uncle Al, to say thank you.”

Pianist, composer, producer and conductor Vijay Iyer lit up the concert hall with his sextet as they performed music from his latest CD, “Far From Over” (ECM). The only member missing from the recording was drummer Tyshawn Sorey, replaced by 23-year-old Jeremy Dutton, who was very impressive.

Iyer, who likes to expand his playing beyond traditional jazz barriers, was joined by his regular sextet which included alto saxophonist Steve Lehman, tenor saxophonist Mark Shim and Graham Haynes on crown and bugle.

The sextet flirted with tradition before jumping into a free form that encompasses classic phrasing. The music is explosive like a firecracker, always exciting but never hard on the eardrums. “The title refers to the problems in America and other parts of the world,” Iyer said. “The fight against racism and fascism is ‘Far from over’, the fight for civil rights, women’s rights and equality is ‘Far from being over’.”

David Byrne was a big deal at the festival. He was one of the most eager to see artists, which made sense as he’s a creative innovator. He is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter, record producer, actor and writer whose music spans new wave, post-punk and worldbeat categories.

Before his introduction – David Byrne “American Utopia” – the stage was bare, no piano, drums, bass, nothing. Her 11-piece ensemble took to the stage, all dressed in gray three-button suits like Byrne.

The concert turned into a dance party when Byrne asked security to stop harassing people who were trying to dance, “If you stop them from dancing, the concert is over.” Nuff said!

Musicians Aaron Johnston on snare / hi-hat and Daniel Freedman on snare / hi-hat had their instruments attached to them, allowing the whole ensemble to occupy the entire stage, walking and falling into a certain creativity choreographic movements. Having the instruments carried by the musicians while opening the stage to various modes of creativity is genius.

Byrne asked Janelle Monae for permission to use her song “Say My Name”. Along with a brisk walk, they called out the names of African-American men and women who had been abused, interspersed with chants of “Say His Name”. These include recent victims of police brutality, including Walter Scott, Freddie Gray, Sandra Bland, Kimani Gray, Michael Brown and Miriam Carey. Emmett Till was also included.

The ensemble was a real force and guitarist Angie Swan was outrageous.

Singer-songwriter Somi introduced Harlem to Perugia audiences by singing songs such as “Like Dakar”, a ballad of traveling through gentrification, something that happens in Harlem as well as Africa. The song “Alien” refers to immigration. Somi is a storyteller with an activist perception in the tradition of Nina Simone, Abbey Lincoln and Miriam Makeba (who shares her African roots). These songs were taken from his latest CD “Petite Afrique” (Sony Music).

The Not A What quintet with pianist Giovanni Guidi, trumpeter Fabrizio Bosso, saxophonist Aaron Burnett, bassist Dezron Douglas and drummer Joe Dyson. This young quintet performed with the intensity of a roaring bullet train on “Straight Life” and entered the station for their encore, “My Funny Valentine”. The musicians met 12 days before the concert and rehearsed for three hours. Despite their brief collaboration, the performance went effortlessly.

Kurt Elling’s distinctive vocal instrument, that tenor intonation and phrasing, set him apart from the rest of the jazz band. His choice of material is generally off the beaten track, such as his rendition of “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” by Bob Dylan, “I Have Dreamed” and “American Tune” by Paul Simon, all taken from his latest album “The Questions”. (Sony Music). For this live release, Elling featured fellow Chicago player, trumpeter Marquis Hill. “He’s a natural fit,” Elling said. His encore was an a capella “I Remember Jon Hendrix” with Hill.

If dancing was your goal, all you had to do was follow the sound of the washboard to the sound of Rockin ‘Dopsie Jr. & The Zydeco Twisters. During their late night or afternoon concerts, they made adults, teenagers and students dance for the duration of the shows. “We have so many diverse musicians in the band, we do everything from R&B, funk and blues,” said frontman, singer and washboard player David Rubin. “I call songs by the vibrations of the audience.” One late evening, the nine-piece band which includes his two brothers, drummer / singer Alton Rubin Jr. and accordionist Anthony Michael Rubin, made the audience dance frantically outdoors to tunes such as “Purple Rain,” “Hey Jude”. and “I shot the sheriff.” They are from New Orleans, playing the warm roots of Louisiana zydeco music.

The Umbria Jazz Festival ended in style with Harlem’s favorite son, singer Gregory Porter. It is a pleasure to see Porter at such international festivals, having gone from St. Nick’s pub in Harlem. Porter brings the soul, like a Southern Baptist minister. His sermon for the evening came from his latest CD “Nat King Cole & Me” (Blue Note Records).

Porter stood erect like a black prince, in a blue tuxedo sports jacket with white pants and his familiar black cap. He sang under the Perugia moon as that hip breeze carried his tenor-tinged renditions of “Mona Lisa”, “Ballerina”, “Ms. Otis Regrets “and” I Wonder Who My Daddy Is “high in the sky as the” King “looked down with a smile and said,” You look good, kid, unforgettable. ”

The Umbria Jazz Orchestra, composed of 70 musicians, conducted by Vince Mendoza, was such a beautiful accompaniment for Porter. Together, they touched the inner being of the audience like a mother’s kiss.

This is how the Umbria Jazz Festival ended, with exceptional moments that will make hearts beat faster. Music defies any language or race. He heals souls and brings the world together for a higher groove.


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Highlights of the Umbria Jazz Festival – New York Amsterdam News https://kmjazz.com/highlights-of-the-umbria-jazz-festival-new-york-amsterdam-news/ Thu, 02 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/highlights-of-the-umbria-jazz-festival-new-york-amsterdam-news/ Covering the Umbrian Jazz Festival was a somewhat surreal experience. Strolling around Perugia’s old town, watching live music while strolling through historic sites such as the Cathedral, the Etruscan well (dating from the 3rd century) and the Palazzo Sorbello house-museum, a palace dating from the late 16th century which was bought in 1780 by the […]]]>

Covering the Umbrian Jazz Festival was a somewhat surreal experience. Strolling around Perugia’s old town, watching live music while strolling through historic sites such as the Cathedral, the Etruscan well (dating from the 3rd century) and the Palazzo Sorbello house-museum, a palace dating from the late 16th century which was bought in 1780 by the Marquis Bourbon di Sorbello.

The constant dilemma was whether to stop for ice cream, pizza, pasta, or Italian beer. No no. It will be time later. Right now, jazz is in the air and screams my name, so head to Jazz Goes to the Museum for Dan Kinzelman’s “Ghost” with multi-instrumentalists Mirco Rubegni on trumpet, horn and snare; Manuele Morbichini on alto saxophone; Rossano Emili on baritone saxophone and bass clarinet; and Kinzelman on flute, clarinet and tenor saxophone.

Like with a ghost, you didn’t see what was to come. They sounded like a chamber music quartet. Playing all of the original tunes (from Kinzelman), they started out in a classic area that turned into a flow of intuitive improvisation that continued to flow with more intensity. Yes, avant-garde lives. Lester Bowie and Eric Dolphy would be delighted.

New York’s favorite Texan son Roy Hargrove and his quintet performed at the Round Midnight concert at the Teatro Morlacchi. Despite the late hour, the room was packed. His band included alto saxophonist Justin Robinson, pianist Tadataka Unno, bassist Ameen Saleen and drummer Quincy Phillips.

Hargrove, never one for categorization, has traversed traditions from jazz to R&B to hip-hop beats. His arrangement of “Bring It on Home to Me” by Sam Cooke was jerky. Hargrove was in rare form as he danced and sang to the tunes “Never Let Me Go” and “Soothe Me”. During his bugle solos on ballads like “I’m Glad There Is You”, we don’t know whether to cry or sigh. His proficient group was a high rising force throughout.

Who would have thought that the Younger Take 6, who hosted the first a cappella group in 1980 while attending Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama, would still be going strong.


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Copenhagen Jazz Festival highlights include Jeff Beck, Pharoah Sanders https://kmjazz.com/copenhagen-jazz-festival-highlights-include-jeff-beck-pharoah-sanders/ https://kmjazz.com/copenhagen-jazz-festival-highlights-include-jeff-beck-pharoah-sanders/#respond Tue, 10 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/copenhagen-jazz-festival-highlights-include-jeff-beck-pharoah-sanders/ The 40th edition of the Copenhagen Jazz Festival, which takes place July 6-15, featured a truly impressive range of music with around 100 venues hosting over 1,400 acts. The city-wide celebration draws on a loose consortium of independent promoters, producers, programmers, musicians and club owners to reserve a talent mix featuring Danish artists, older companions, […]]]>

The 40th edition of the Copenhagen Jazz Festival, which takes place July 6-15, featured a truly impressive range of music with around 100 venues hosting over 1,400 acts. The city-wide celebration draws on a loose consortium of independent promoters, producers, programmers, musicians and club owners to reserve a talent mix featuring Danish artists, older companions, new talent and international stars from around the world – all with a healthy respect for the history and traditions of jazz.

High-profile artists like Jeff Beck, The Roots and the Brad Mehldau Trio all had big nights at the start of the festival, while saxophone icon Pharoah Sanders (pictured) took the stage for two sold-out shows in the ‘intimate Brorson’s Church. Veteran drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath has enjoyed the backing of a decidedly international band, as have Boston saxophonists George Garzone and Jerry Bergonzi, both of whom have been coming to the festival for years, each performing with a group of accomplished Danish companions. .

On Friday night, the Brad Mehldau Trio kicked off the festival at the elegant DR Concert House, featuring several tracks from their new album “Seymour Reads The Constitution” on the Nonesuch Records label. Mehldau’s longtime piano trio, bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Jeff Ballard performed together, coming together on fluid original compositions as well as fair renditions of Sam Rivers’ tune “Beatrice” and the infamous standard. rock “Hey Joe”.

Guitar legend Jeff Beck performed the DR on Monday night, drawing a repertoire of five decades of recording. Starring super drummer Vinnie Colaiuta, bassist Rhonda Smith, cellist Vanessa Freebairn-Smith and singer Jimmy Hall, Beck dazzled the crowd with impeccable jazz-fusion instrumentals as well as 20th century nugget fret interpretations like ” A Day In The Life “,” A Change Is Gonna Come “,” Superstition “by Stevie Wonder and” Little Wing “by Jimi Hendrix. Meanwhile, down in the DR in Studio 2, Lee Fields and The Expressions were moving and scolding their hot buttery soul review for a younger, more energetic audience.

Brazilian artists are in full effect here in Copenhagen. Singer Clara Valente was skillfully supported by Astro Buddha Agogo on an outdoor stage. Singer Seu George is expected to present his eccentric “The Life Aquatic: Tribute To David Bowie” later this week. Beloved Brazilian composer / musician Hermeto Pascoal will also bring his special musical magic to Copenhagen, making a rare European appearance at the Cowbell venue on Thursday evening.

Danish saxophonist Ben Koppel paid tribute to tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon on Saturday, in front of a group of Danish jazz veterans who worked with Dexter when he was expatriated to Denmark in the 1960s. The group included Koppel, the drummer legend Alex Riel, bassist Bo Stief and pianist Ole Kock Hansen playing tunes from Dexter’s 1962 Blue Note album “Go!” Koppel directs the entire Cowbell musical series, allowing him to program incredible artists like Hermeto Pascoal, percussionist Marylyn Mazur and a tribute to Leonard Bernstein. He will also perform in the Jazz Clash project with American pianist Uri Caine and trumpeter Ralph Alessi alongside dancers, drummer Riel and singer Caecilie Norby.

Eccentrics rock and folk have also found their place in the program, including American musician Howe Gelb from Giant Sand who has lived in Denmark for some time and is always welcome when he returns. English folk experimenter Mike Cooper has been making records since the 1960s, and he brought his unusual one-on-one multimedia show to the Loco Nights series at the Christahvens Beboerhus Cultural Center. British MOBO award winners Sons Of Kemet will perform on Tuesday evening, mixing their unique jazz aesthetic with elements of rock, African and Caribbean folk forms.

Among the most notable Danish talents would be jazz guitarist Jakob Bro, who will perform tracks from his latest ECM album “Returning” with trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg, Norwegian drummer Jon Christensen and American bassist Thomas Morgan. Hess / AC / Hess is also recommended with pianist Nikolaj Hess, his brother Mikkel Hess on drums and double bass player Anders “AC” Christensen. They host a late night jam session every night at the Cava Bar and perform several times during the festival.

Rather than being concentrated in a single district, the CPH Jazz Festival is spread throughout the Danish city, offering performances in elegant theaters, concert halls, outdoor stages, cafes, restaurants, museums, parks, seaside resorts, hotel bars and a host of authentic jazz clubs.


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Next Generation Jazz Festival spotlights hundreds of young musicians – Monterey Herald https://kmjazz.com/next-generation-jazz-festival-spotlights-hundreds-of-young-musicians-monterey-herald/ https://kmjazz.com/next-generation-jazz-festival-spotlights-hundreds-of-young-musicians-monterey-herald/#respond Sun, 11 Mar 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/next-generation-jazz-festival-spotlights-hundreds-of-young-musicians-monterey-herald/ MONTEREY >> The hottest ticket in town this weekend didn’t cost a dime. Admission to the 48th annual Next Generation Jazz Festival was free. Sponsored by the Monterey Jazz Festival, the event, which began Friday and ended Sunday afternoon, was a gift of exceptional music. He has presented over 150 performances by 100 groups, ranging […]]]>

MONTEREY >> The hottest ticket in town this weekend didn’t cost a dime. Admission to the 48th annual Next Generation Jazz Festival was free.

Sponsored by the Monterey Jazz Festival, the event, which began Friday and ended Sunday afternoon, was a gift of exceptional music.

He has presented over 150 performances by 100 groups, ranging from college to college. Between 1,200 and 1,300 students attended, representing 11 states, including California.

There were also music clinics, special guest groups, star performers and a concert of judges.

Competitions included soloists, high school and college big bands, high school and college vocal ensembles, high school and college combos, college big bands, and conglomerate big bands.

The competitions took place in the newly renovated Monterey Convention Center and the Portola Hotel & Spa. They were also broadcast live on the Monterey Jazz Festival website.

Annika Jewett of Eckstein Middle School in Seattle was attending the festival for the first time. She played guitar in the 41-member group and wore a green Seattle Seahawks cap.

“It was fun,” she said of the festival. She said she liked jazz. “It’s fun to play,” she said. “… Anyone can just jam together.”

On level two of the convention center, there was a backdrop of the Monterey Jazz Festival logo, including a trumpet on a bentwood chair. Members of the group and their leaders posed for photos in front of him. Some of them have held their prices.

Among them was Rita Zigas-Brown, principal of the Walnut Creek Intermediate School WIC Jazzers. They were there for the second time and the members left with prizes. They were among the six finalists in their division.

“My alto saxophonist won Best Leading Role and my trumpeter won a second prize, a $ 300 scholarship for the Summer Music Camp at the Brubeck Institute (at the University of the Pacific in Stockton),” said Zigas-Brown.

What did she think of the festival?

“It’s amazing,” she said. She said she was impressed with the energy of the students. “The festival is collegial and welcoming,” she said. “… It’s really energizing to be here.

Greg Brown, Zigas-Brown’s husband, set a record with his band, the Northgate High School Jazz Band of Walnut Creek. The group won the high school big band competition for the fifth year in a row. The group has been a finalist for 12 of the past 13 years.

The Frost School of Music at the University of Miami (Coral Gables, Florida) Frost Studio Jazz Band was back this year. He has won his division the past two years. The group nearly blew up the roof of the Serra Ballroom with their performance

The performances of the American River College Vocal Jazz Ensemble and the College of San Mateo Jazz Ensemble were also impressive.

Among the Big Band College judges was Tanya Darby, a music star from Seaside. She teaches principal trumpet and introductory jazz recordings at the University of North Texas School of Music. She also directs the Three O’Clock Lab Band there and performs professionally.

For contest results and festival videos, visit the Monterey Jazz Festival website.


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