hip hop – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 08:59:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kmjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-53-120x120.png hip hop – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ 32 32 Redlands Bowl Announces 2022 Summer Music Festival Lineup – Redlands Daily Facts https://kmjazz.com/redlands-bowl-announces-2022-summer-music-festival-lineup-redlands-daily-facts/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 05:02:26 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/redlands-bowl-announces-2022-summer-music-festival-lineup-redlands-daily-facts/ Redlands Bowl Performing Arts will have a full season this year, and it will include a special tribute celebrating the legacy of longtime Bowl bandleader Frank Fetta, who passed away in 2021. The line-up for the Summer Music Festival, announced Wednesday evening March 9, includes: June 24: An evening with Debby Boone, known for her […]]]>

Redlands Bowl Performing Arts will have a full season this year, and it will include a special tribute celebrating the legacy of longtime Bowl bandleader Frank Fetta, who passed away in 2021.

The line-up for the Summer Music Festival, announced Wednesday evening March 9, includes:

  • June 24: An evening with Debby Boone, known for her 1977 hit “You Light Up My Life”
  • June 28: Grand Final of the Redlands Bowl concerto competition led by Maestro Roger Kalia, musical director of the concerto competition for young artists
  • July 8: Mariachi Garibaldi by Jaime Cuéllar with an appearance by the Ballet Folklórico de Los Ángeles
  • July 12: DRUMLINE LIVE, an international tour based on the traditions of the Historically Black College and University brass bands
  • July 15: M-PACT, an avant-garde vocal ensemble that mixes soul, funk and more
  • July 19: Pete Jacobs Wartime Radio Revue, a big-band, playing hits from the 30s and 40s, original songs, wartime news and more
  • July 22: Frisson at the Pops, a classical music ensemble that will perform selections from “Rhapsody in Blue” by Gershwin, West Side Story and “Oblivion” by Piazzolla and more
  • July 28-31: Disney’s “The Little Mermaid” presented by producer and director Wayne Scott (public rehearsal July 26)
  • August 2: Sgt. Peppers Lonely Bluegrass Band with Jazz, Classical and Bluegrass covers Beatles tunes
  • August 5: Lemon Bucket Orkestra, a folk-punk klezmer ensemble from Toronto
  • August 9: SKERRYVORE, energetic Scottish music
  • August 12: State Street Ballet, performing selections ranging from tango to waltz and hip-hop
  • August 16: “Songs and Stories” Celebrating the Musical Legacy of Maestro Frank Fetta will be performed by singer Lana Love, baritone Ralph Cato and the Cool Classics Ensemble
  • August 19: Season finale with the Redlands Symphony Orchestra conducted by Ransom Wilson and with guest artist Aubree Oliverson

Due to contractual arrangements, the July 1 and July 5 shows will be announced later this spring.

The 2022 Music Festival is the first fully in-person season since 2019. Due to coronavirus precautions, the 2020 season was held virtually and the 2021 season began with virtual shows.

This year is the 99th season of the music festival.

Performances begin at 8:00 a.m. at Redlands Bowl, 25 Grant St. Admission is free and seating is first come first served.

Information: redlandsbowl.org or 909-793-7316

This story is developing. Check back for updates.

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Lisa Kocay’s Top 10 Songs by Black Artists https://kmjazz.com/lisa-kocays-top-10-songs-by-black-artists/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 22:26:42 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/lisa-kocays-top-10-songs-by-black-artists/ From top left to bottom right: Carl Cox (courtesy of Carl Cox), Moore Kismet (courtesy of Moore … [+] Kismet), Honey Dijon (courtesy of Ricardo Gomez), DJ Minx (courtesy of Joe Gall) and Black Coffee (courtesy of Alari Teede). Carl Cox (courtesy of Carl Cox), Moore Kismet (courtesy of Moore Kismet), Honey Dijon (courtesy of […]]]>

Celebrate Black History Month by supporting black creatives. Buy their music, stream their songs, share their stories, showcase their talents and more. Dance music was born out of black culture, and this is too often forgotten as the genre has gone white.

Remember the roots of dance music by granting black excellence through various genres of dance music. My top 10 tracks include everything from house to techno, dubstep, African house and more.

Let these songs follow not only your Black History Month, but also your daily life.

“Intimidated (with ELLE)” —Kaytranada

Kaytranada stuns fans with “Intimidated,” featuring singer-songwriter HER Boasting captivating vocals, heart-pounding bass underpinned by soothing production, and sounds meant to encourage applause, the record is turns out to be masterfully produced. Kaytranada won Best Dance/Electronic Album for BOUBA at the first ceremony of the 63rd GRAMMY Awards. Previously, he also won the GRAMMY for Best Dance Recording for “10%” with Kali Uchis.

“Rumor” —Moore Kismet

Moore Kismet impresses music lovers with “Rumors”. The record proves to be texturally varied, with everything from percolating beats to shimmering synths, enchanting vocals and airy production that leads to eerie bass. The 17-year-old producer performed at the Electric Daisy Carnival in 2021, making him the youngest producer to perform at the famous festival.

“We are a” —Carl Cox

“We Are One” begins with a monologue from Carl Cox detailing his desire to play his soulful music influenced by the genres that got him to where he is today. Then the record turns into a beautiful, happy and loud production. Carl Cox is considered an acid house veteran, techno champion and dance music pioneer.

“Voice Messaging” – Green velvet

Taste pioneer Green Velvet, part of the second wave of influential house artists, stuns with “Voicemail.” The 2014 track, created with Patrick Topping, offers catchy vocals, bouncy basslines, voicemail clips of people asking for favors, woozy synths and more, creating what has become an anthemic record. Green Velvet’s career began over 25 years ago and he is the founder of Relief Records. The underground artist is well known for his quirky green mohawk.

“Ready for You (feat. Celeste)” – Black coffee

The godfather of South African house music, Black Coffee, delivers a moving production with “Ready for You”. The haunting track features raw vocals, heavenly production and the artist’s South African house flair. The disc is part of Black Coffee’s second 12-track album, Unconsciously.

“Paradise” —HoneyLuv

Rock out to bass-heavy house in HoneyLuv’s “Paradise.” The track features seductive lyrics and sultry production. HoneyLuv is known for her influences on the house, techno and hip hop and RnB scenes.

“We don’t play” — 12th Planet

Headbangers, prepare your neck braces. Tune in for fast rapping, sample sounds from other artists, an awesome showcase of various synths, and what can only be described as gross bass. 12th Planet is the boss of the label SMOG Records. The artist is considered one of the first ambassadors of dubstep in the United States following his co-signings of Skream and Rusko and a report on Diplo’s blow your mind compilation.

“Work (feat. Dave Giles II, Cor. Ece & Mike Dunn)” — Dijon honey

The Chicago-born artist brings the funk with “Work.” The sultry track features jazz, catchy lyrics and powerful lyrics, bouncy production and more, creating a record designed for pure dancefloor elation. The record is taken from the next Honey Dijon black girl magic album.

“We are all moving forward together” — Downtown and Idris Elba

“We All Move Together” features an inspiring and powerful monologue by Idris Elba about the history of dance music and Inner City founder Kevin Saunderson’s contributions to the evolution of the genre as he is considered the one of the ancestors of techno. Indeed, the track is done in true Inner City style as it is meaningful, moving and uplifting. The song comes from the recently released Detroit electronic band’s first album in 30 years, We all move together.

“Queendom” — DJ Minx

DJ Minx’s “Queendom” keeps the funk alive. With productions of African house and flashing synths, it delivers tons of sonic sparkle. The entertainer is a long-time fixture of Detroit’s club scene, and she’s often called the wax first lady. She’s known for doing everything from deep, minimal music to fiery, funky music.

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Broward Center Presents RHYTHM BY THE RIVER Festival Celebrating Black Voices https://kmjazz.com/broward-center-presents-rhythm-by-the-river-festival-celebrating-black-voices/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 03:21:32 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/broward-center-presents-rhythm-by-the-river-festival-celebrating-black-voices/ The Broward Center for the Performing Arts presents Rhythm by the River, a festival celebrating some of Broward County’s most exciting and innovative black voices. Sons of Mystro is headlining this free event on Sunday, March 20 from 2-6 p.m. at Esplanade Park in downtown Fort Lauderdale. The community is invited to come together for […]]]>

The Broward Center for the Performing Arts presents Rhythm by the River, a festival celebrating some of Broward County’s most exciting and innovative black voices. Sons of Mystro is headlining this free event on Sunday, March 20 from 2-6 p.m. at Esplanade Park in downtown Fort Lauderdale.

The community is invited to come together for a fun day of music, dance, drama, poetry and interactive events for the whole family. Hosted by WPLG-Local 10 presenter and reporter Alexis Frazier, this free community event features live performances, food trucks, workshops, arts and crafts, and more throughout the post- midday.

On the main stage, purple flow offers a fusion of Hip-Hop and R&B sounds. the Randy Corinthian Quintet brings a soulful and sophisticated set of smooth jazz hits. The beat continues with the West African Drum and Dance ensemble Fallou Troop. Renegade Theater Company offers a dynamic range of Broadway musical hits from their repertoire. Art Prevails Project features a mix of spoken word and theatrical vignettes from their critically acclaimed work. Guests will get a preview of the upcoming play Head Above Water: The Life of Esther Rolle by Darius V. Daughtry, directed by Bianca LaVerne Jones, commissioned by the African American Research Library and Cultural Center. In the grand finale, violin virtuosos Son of Mystro headlining the festivities fusing their unique blend of classic strings with reggae hits and American pop songs along with some of their own original works.

Everyone is invited to participate in the creation of a community mural with visual artist Constance Ivana in the park, or come to the Mary N. Porter Riverview Ballroom at the Broward Center to participate in a Teeny Violini music with the founder of the New Canon Chamber Collective. Portia Dunkley, a spoken word poetry session with performer and FLO’etry founder Jerris “Quick the Poet” Evans or a hip-hop dance class with choreographer and Developing Dreams Foundation Executive Director Pablo Malco.

You’ll have the opportunity to get to know your neighbors, enjoy great entertainment, and learn about the African American Research Library and Cultural Center. Vicar of Black ExcellenceArt Prevails Project, Black Violin Foundation, FLO’etry, Developing Dreams Foundation, New Canon Chamber Collective, Old Dillard Museum, Renegade Theater Company and more.

Rhythm by the River is part of the Broward Center for the Performing Arts’ Arts for Action: Black Voices initiative, which uses the arts as a catalyst to raise awareness, build knowledge, and mobilize action on social justice issues. The initiative was supported by the following funds from the Community Foundation of Broward: Mary N. Porter Community Impact Fund, Community Concerts Association of Fort Lauderdale Performing Arts Fund, A Fund for the Performing Arts and the Linda and the Michael Carter Funds. Other supporters of the initiative include the BBX Capital Foundation and JM Family Enterprises, Inc.

Rhythm by the River festival partners include Riverwalk Fort Lauderdale, the African American Research Library and Cultural Center, and the Art Prevails Project.

To learn more about Arts for Action: Black Voices events or to get involved, visit BrowardCenter.org email artsforaction@bwardcenter.org.

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6 artists you can’t miss at Noise Pop 2022 https://kmjazz.com/6-artists-you-cant-miss-at-noise-pop-2022/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 19:46:23 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/6-artists-you-cant-miss-at-noise-pop-2022/ Topaz Jones is more than a talented hip-hop artist, he’s on his way to becoming an author. With his album 2021 Don’t tell your mamahe co-directed a short film of the same name which won a Sundance Award and achieved wide release via The New York Times. Inspired by Black ABCs flashcards that two teachers […]]]>

Topaz Jones is more than a talented hip-hop artist, he’s on his way to becoming an author. With his album 2021 Don’t tell your mamahe co-directed a short film of the same name which won a Sundance Award and achieved wide release via The New York Times. Inspired by Black ABCs flashcards that two teachers developed in Chicago in the 70s, the film uses the alphabet as a storytelling device that stitches together vignettes about black family life, educational pursuits, activism, art and friendships. In the world of Topaz Jones, C is for code change and V is for value. It’s perfect for modern TikTok-related attention spans, but that doesn’t mean it lacks substance or soul. On the contrary, it proves that Jones’ ingenuity deserves much more recognition.


Opening for the Moorish Mother and the Irreversible Entanglements
The New Parish, Oakland
February 23

Before the term “hyperpop” entered common vocabulary, Tyler Holmes sang and rapped over his self-produced chaotic, glitchy beats and industrial noise. But over the past two years, the artist has leaned into his singer-songwriter side. Their 2021 album, nightmare in paradise, offers a space to process trauma with stripped-down tracks that combine beautiful acoustic guitars, cellos and woodwinds, delicate vocals and experimental electronics. Holmes wrote it after caring for a friend who was shot and survived a random attack while they were touring Puerto Rico together. Always the one who makes beauty out of tragedy, Holmes makes room for our collective grief.





With spiritual and provocative cramp
DNA Lounge, San Francisco
February 25

There’s something special about the way Kris Esfandiari’s buzzing voice can lull you into peaceful reverie one minute and open you up with rage and catharsis the next. The lead singer of Oakland doom metal band King Woman is one of the most compelling performers of her genre. Her earlier work was rooted in dealing with a religious upbringing which she described as “bigoted”, and on King Woman’s 2021 album, Heavenly Blues, she draws on biblical archetypes to create a gothic drama of her own design. Esfandiari’s involvement in creative scenes and communities outside of metal means his work isn’t just relegated to a niche. She last performed at Bottom of the Hill at Noise Pop 2019 with her other project, Miserable, and with King Woman she takes the lead on a much bigger stage at DNA Lounge.





With Cheflee
The New Parish, Oakland
February 25

In some circles, jazz and hip-hop are in constant dialogue, and Chicago drummer, producer and beat scientist Makaya McCraven is one of the vehicles for this creative conversation. McCraven looks to the past and the future to create new possibilities: just look at his latest album, Decrypt the messagewhere, like a true crate digger in the tradition of J Dilla, he pulls interesting sounds released before the 1960s from the legendary Blue Note Records catalog, mixing them with modern recordings by top instrumentalists in his band and blurring the lines of time and space in the process.





Joe Henderson Lab at SFJAZZ Center, San Francisco
February 25

Valerie Troutt’s big, beautiful voice and high-energy house beats unite in divine synergy: together they can move your body and mind to a brief moment of spiritual enlightenment on the dance floor. The Oakland singer brings gospel-trained skills to the microphone and uses her voice with powerful intent. In addition to self-producing and writing her music, she is a lifelong community activist who uses music as a source of healing and strength, especially for black women.





With Lil Mariko and Death Tour
august room
February 25

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Newfoundland artists earn 45 ECMA nominations; Stingray NL receives three https://kmjazz.com/newfoundland-artists-earn-45-ecma-nominations-stingray-nl-receives-three/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 15:57:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/newfoundland-artists-earn-45-ecma-nominations-stingray-nl-receives-three/ Newfoundland and Labrador earned 45 nominations for the 2022 East Coast Music Awards across a number of music and industry categories. The province’s leading nominees are Justin Fancy, Quote the Raven and Kelly McMichael with three nominations each. VOCM program director Greg Smith was nominated as Media Person of the Year, while VOCM and sister […]]]>

Newfoundland and Labrador earned 45 nominations for the 2022 East Coast Music Awards across a number of music and industry categories.

The province’s leading nominees are Justin Fancy, Quote the Raven and Kelly McMichael with three nominations each.

VOCM program director Greg Smith was nominated as Media Person of the Year, while VOCM and sister station New Country NL are nominated in the Media Outlet of the Year category.

Four of the six nominations in the Album of the Year category involve Newfoundland-based artists.

The 2022 ECMAs will take place May 4-8 in Fredericton, New Brunswick.

*Newfoundland and Labrador applicants in bold*

Music nominees

African-Canadian Artist of the Year

  • King Sway
  • LXVNDR
  • Marc Riley
  • One8tea
  • Zamani

album of the year

  • Carolina East – Soaked in Whiskey
  • Chloé Breault – Beach of Cretins
  • Hillsburn – Eclipse
  • Kelly McMichael – Waves
  • Raven Quote – Can’t Hold the Light
  • Rube & Rake – Leaving with nothing

Blues Recording of the Year

  • Beauwater – Who works for whom?
  • Campbell & Johnston – Campbell & Johnston’s Black Market Band (eponymous)
  • Jon Hines – Down To Funk (DTF)
  • JP LeBlanc – Late All Day
  • Wayne Nicholson and John Campbelljohn – Elmore’s Blues

Children’s Animator of the Year

  • Dr G.
  • Dr Zoo
  • Gordie Crazylegs Mac Keeman
  • Stupid Robbie
  • Sue McBride

Classical Composer of the Year

  • Adam Vincent Clarke
  • Amy Brandon
  • Clifford Crawley
  • Grej
  • Monica Pearce

Classical Recording of the Year

  • Daniel Cabena and Stephen Runge – A sanctuary in song
  • Mark Fewer – Rossini: 6 Sonata A Quattro
  • Maureen Batt & Grej – Lighthouse
  • Sarah Hagen – Johann Sebastian Bach: Goldberg Variations
  • Steve Cowan and Adam Cicchillitti – Intimate Impressions

Contemporary Roots Recording of the Year

  • Dave Carroll – Until One Day
  • Leona Burkey – Sitting Tight
  • Nathan Wiley – Modern Magic
  • Ocean Playground – Ocean Playground: living in Halifax
  • Raven Quote – Can’t Hold the Light

Country Recording of the Year

  • Carolina East – Soaked in Whiskey
  • Charlie A’Court & Witchitaw – When Country Gets The Blues
  • Justin Fancy – Of course beats a good time
  • Scott MacKay – Stupid Cupid
  • Divorcees – Drop of Blood

Dance Recording of the Year

  • Alex Byrne – “I want to be the only feat. Tima Dee”
  • Cloverdale & FWLR – “Old School”
  • Joel Freck – “Dawn ft Maryn”
  • KINLEY – “Run With You (Lee Rosevere Remix)”
  • PINEO & LOEB – “Good feeling of atmosphere”

Electronic Record of the Year

  • DenMother – Frenzied Ram
  • Lazermortis – Autonetic Afterlife
  • LXVNDR – Heat
  • Paragon Cause – Autopilot
  • Virginia Fudge – All those little games

Francophone recording of the year

  • Cédric Vieno – Maltastorm
  • Chloé Breault – Beach of Cretins
  • Marty B – J’Feel Crazy
  • Matt Boudreau – Armageddon
  • Sluice – Success through hard work

Folk Recording of the Year

  • Daniel James McFadyen – August I’m Yours
  • Mo Kenney – Blankets
  • Rosemary Lawton – Canvas
  • Terra Spencer – Chasing Rabbits
  • The Gilberts – Tell me

World Recording of the Year

  • Ana & Eric Hope-Ana & Eric
  • Andy Creeggan – Andiwork IV
  • King Sway – Reverie
  • Small Fish – The Drift

Group Recording of the Year

  • Hillsburn – Eclipse
  • Paragon Cause – Autopilot
  • Raven Quote – Can’t Hold the Light
  • Rick Sparkes + The Enablers – Fun in the Pathless Woods
  • Divorcees – Drop of Blood
  • City Heroes – Home

Indigenous Artist of the Year

  • Alan Syliboy and the Thundermakers
  • Francois Blake
  • Morgan Toney
  • Pass from Tha 902
  • wolf castle

Inspirational Recording of the Year

  • Becka deHaan – Soothing Confidence and Coming King
  • Lewisville Worship – Amid the Winter Snow
  • Mark Flowerdew – Let’s Go
  • Matt Linton – Do You Know How It Feels
  • Morgan Toney – First Flight

Instrumental Recording of the Year

  • Andy Creeggan – Andiwork IV
  • David Myles – This great distance
  • Duane Andrews – singles
  • Blackwood – Lost and Found
  • Sam Wilson – In A Heart Part II

Jazz Recording of the Year

  • Beth McKenna – Beyond Here
  • Measha Brueggergosman – Measha Jazz
  • Blackwood – Lost and Found
  • Steve Amirault – Montreal Jazz Trio
  • The Vesuvius Big Band – Live at Open Waters Festival

Strong recording of the year

  • Botfly – Lower Than Love
  • Hemineglict – is obsolete
  • Rootabagga – Abby Normal
  • Six Gun Smoke – Six Gun Smoke
  • War and Sin – The War Within

Pop Recording of the Year

  • Brandon Howard Roy – Hard Stuff
  • Chloé Breault – Beach of Cretins
  • Hillsburn – Eclipse
  • Kin Crew – I Swear I’m Fine
  • Levi Rowan – Self-Hating Narcissist

R&B/Soul Recording of the Year

  • Janet Cull – Hear It Out
  • Laura Roy – Tides
  • Logan Richard – Logan Richard (eponymous)
  • Mark Riley – One Step
  • Zamani – “Selfish”

Rap/Hip-Hop Recording of the Year

  • Aquakultre x DJ Uncle Fester – Bleeding Gums Murphy
  • Atay & JAX – YOU DESERVE THE MOON
  • Mitchell Bailey – 23 years old
  • One8tea – Breakdown 2
  • Wolf Castle – Da Vinci’s Investigation

Rising Star Recording of the Year

  • Alicia Toner – Joan
  • Burry – Yellow Paint
  • Kelly McMichael – Waves
  • Morgan Toney – First Flight
  • Paragon Cause – Autopilot

Rock Recording of the Year

  • Andre Pettipas and the Giants – No Fools No Fun
  • Andrew Waite – Andrew Waite (eponymous)
  • Kelly McMichael – Waves
  • POSTDATA – Twin Flames
  • City Heroes – Home

Roots/Traditional Recording of the Year

  • Adam Young – Directory
  • Brad Reid – NEW Scotland
  • Virtual Choir of Acadia – Our Music Season 1
  • The LeBlanc Family – Three pretty young ladies
  • Séan McCann – SHANTYMAN

Solo Recording of the Year

  • Alicia Toner – Joan
  • Andrew Waite – Andrew Waite
  • Andy Creeggan – Andiwork IV
  • Justin Fancy – Of course beats a good time
  • Laurie LeBlanc – When it’s good, it’s good

song of the year

  • Breagh Isabel – “Girlfriends”
  • Dylan Menzie – “A Heart That Doesn’t Want Mine”
  • Hillsburn – “Get High”
  • City Heroes – “Queen”
  • Yvette Lorraine – “Where Have You Been”

Songwriter of the Year

  • Kellie Loder
  • Paul Arntzen
  • POSTDATA
  • Rube & Rake
  • city ​​heroes

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Industry nominees

Innovative Artist of the Year

  • Acadian Virtual Choir
  • Keith Mullins
  • Mallory Johnson
  • silver wolf ring
  • T. Thomason and Katie Clarke

Company of the year

  • First Light Center for Performance and Creativity
  • Dam on the lake
  • Side door access
  • Sound concerts
  • sound of pop

Event of the year

  • Blueberry jam
  • Dam on the lake
  • Lunenburg Folk Harbor Mini-Festival
  • Nova Scotia Summer Festival
  • Paddlefest outdoor music and entertainment festival

Industrial Innovator of the Year

  • atlantic music
  • Heidi-Lyn O’Connor (East Track Mind)
  • Dam on the lake
  • Hood
  • Nova Scotia’s Ultimate Online Cooking Party (Covid19 Edition)

Management/Manager of the Year

  • Adrienne Butcher, Estuary Artists
  • Carole Chouinard
  • Kate Butler, she said Feck Records
  • Nigel Jenkins, Music of the Laughing Heart
  • Sonic Entertainment Group

Media of the year

  • Track spirit is
  • Light First Fridays
  • New Country NL
  • VOC

Media Person of the Year

  • Amy Joy
  • Greg Smith
  • Heidi Lyn O’Connor
  • Richard Lan

Producer of the Year

  • Chris Iannetti
  • Chris Kirby
  • Corey LeRue
  • Erin Costelo
  • John Mullane (future dad)

Studio Engineer of the Year

  • Chris Iannetti
  • John Mullane (future dad)
  • Mike “Sheppy” Berger
  • Scott Ferguson
  • Thomas Stajcer

Workshop of the year

  • Recording of crocs
  • PMF Matrix
  • Iannetti Registration
  • Lakewind Sound Studios
  • The Sonic Temple

Video director of the year

  • Brendan Henry
  • Cecile Johnson
  • Katie Clarke
  • Lauchlan Ough
  • Wilfrid Le Bouthillier

Visual Artist of the Year

  • Mark Young (Andiwork IV)
  • Ashley Anne Clark
  • Krista Power
  • Richard Lan
  • Sara Rankin

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Fans’ Choice Award

Fan-Chosen Artist of the Year

  • Adyn Cities
  • Andrew Waite
  • Christine Martin
  • Hillsburn
  • jimmy rankin
  • justin fancy
  • Kellie Loder
  • Lennie Gallant
  • neon dreams
  • Rich Aucoin
  • T.Thomason
  • city ​​heroes

Fans’ Choice Video of the Year

  • Andrew Waite – “Ain’t Goin’ Out Like That” (Director: Brendan Henry)
  • Breagh Isabel – “Girlfriends” (director: Tamara Black)
  • Dave Sampson – “All My Friends” (Director: Ryker Titus)
  • Hot Mondy—”Pale Ember” (Director: Brad Tobler)
  • Mallory Johnson and Twin Kennedy—”Wise Woman” (director: Cecil Johnson)
  • Neon Dreams – “Say It Out Loud (Feat. Mthandazo Gatya)” (Director: Kyle White)
  • PINEO & LOEB—”Good Vibe Feeling” (Director: Gabe Roy)
  • Rachel Beck—”Dizzy” (Director: Rachel Beck and Savannah Belsher-MacLean)
  • Saint John String Quartet— “Saint John String Quartet | Northwest Passage” (director: Lauchlan Ough)
  • Yvette Lorraine – “Where Have You Been” (Director: Loggo Lionel)

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45th Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival Artists Announced – The Daily Gazette https://kmjazz.com/45th-freihofers-saratoga-jazz-festival-artists-announced-the-daily-gazette/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 03:08:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/45th-freihofers-saratoga-jazz-festival-artists-announced-the-daily-gazette/ Jazz returns to the Saratoga Performing Arts Center this summer with the 45th Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival, scheduled for June 25-26, with a full roster of 24 musical groups performing on two stages. The festival is headlined by Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, returning to the festival for the first time since […]]]>

Jazz returns to the Saratoga Performing Arts Center this summer with the 45th Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival, scheduled for June 25-26, with a full roster of 24 musical groups performing on two stages.

The festival is headlined by Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, returning to the festival for the first time since 1998; soul music legend Booker T. presents: A Stax Revue; powerhouse singer Ledisi for her festival debut; jazz/hip-hop pianist Robert Glasper; and New Orleans funk and jazz collective Galactic with Anjelika Jelly Joseph.

“The 2022 Festival promises to be memorable in many ways. Not only through a stellar and varied lineup, but also the joy of being back on a grand scale,” said Elizabeth Sobol, President and CEO of PSPC.

“We will celebrate 25 years of partnership with Freihofer’s, as well as the first of a new multi-year commitment from the company. As a number of other jazz festivals change and downsize, Freihofer’s support allows us to return to the full Saratoga Jazz Fest experience that its longtime fans have loved and come to expect.

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Booker T. Jones, famed frontman of Booker T. & the MGs and acclaimed producer at legendary Memphis-based Stax Records, highlights the festival’s 15 debut. Jones will feature his 10-piece band with three lead singers performing hits such as “Green Onions”, “Hang ‘Em High” and “Time is Tight” and classic Stax songs “Try a Little Tenderness”, “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” (Otis Redding), “Hold On I’m Coming” (Sam and Dave) and “Gee Whiz” (Carla Thomas), among others. 2021 Grammy Award-winning singer Ledisi makes also her festival debut, which is also set to perform at SPAC on August 3 as part of the Philadelphia Orchestra season in a program dedicated to the music of Nina Simone.

Charles R. Wood’s ‘Jazz Discovery’ stage returns for the first time since 2019, featuring rhythm, global and funk grooves from bands ranging from Red Baraat to Cha Wa to Tiempo Libre and contemporary jazz artists like Matt Wilson, Craig Handy, Connie Han, Ryan Keberle, Emmaline and Dan Wilson. Skidmore Jazz Institute faculty stars will celebrate George Wein, the festival’s founder who passed away at the age of 95 in September 2021.

“My mentor and festival founder, George Wein, has always been focused on producing events for everyone and that’s exactly what we did for our big comeback,” said festival producer Danny Melnick. and president of Absolutely Live Entertainment. “Our 45th festival features award-winning musical legends, unique collaborations with stars, avant-garde bands and many popular rising stars.”

After Jazz Fest debuts in 2021, Saratoga’s Hot Club and Garland Nelson (head of Joyful Noise) will return to kick off the amphitheater’s lineup on Saturday and Sunday, respectively.

Beyond the music, the festival will include a fine arts and crafts fair, artist CD signings, a Southern-style barbecue and other food vendors in the PSPC concession area.

You can bring food and drinks, as well as blankets, tents and umbrellas. Performances will begin each day on the Charles R. Wood “Jazz Discovery” Stage at 11 a.m. and on the Amphitheater Stage at noon.

Tickets for the festival start at $65 and will be available online at spac.org starting March 16 at 10 a.m. for the general public and starting March 7 at 10 a.m. for SPAC members (tiered by tier) .

Two-day passes are also available for a savings of $10 per ticket (offer ends May 1). $20 amphitheater ticket options are available for children 12 and under and students with school-issued ID. Seats are the best available with some exclusions. Seats on the lawn are free for children 12 and under.

Regarding COVID-19 precautions, in a statement, SPAC said it will continue to monitor health and safety guidelines mandated by New York State and the CDC and adjust ticketing policies. and safety accordingly. Full guidelines will be released ahead of the festival.

Here is an overview of the program for Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival 2022:

Saturday June 25

Amphitheater:
Booker T. Presents: A Stax Review
Robert Glasper
Galactic with Anjelika Jelly Joseph
Con Tumbao with Issac Delgado, Robby Ameen, Oscar Hernandez, Conrad Herwig, Pedrito Martinez, Juan Munguia, Alain Pérez, Mike Rodriguez, Tony Succar and Miguel Zenon
Ozmosys Group with Omar Hakim and Rachel Z
Amina Figarova Sextet plus Strings
Saratoga hot club

Scene “Jazz Discovery” by Charles R. Wood:
Barat red
Honey and Salt by Matt Wilson with Dawn Thomson, Nadje Noordhuis, Jeff Lederer and Martin Wind
Craig Handy and 2nd line Smith
Connie Han Threesome
Emmaline
Dan Wilson Trio

Sunday June 26

Amphitheater:
Jazz at the Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis
Ledisi
SuperBlue: Kurt Elling with Charlie Hunter
Eliane Elias
Matthew Whitaker
Joyful Noise by Garland Nelson

Scene “Jazz Discovery” by Charles R. Wood:
Cha Wa
Free time
Carolyn wonderland
Ryan Keberle and Catharsis
Skidmore Jazz Institute faculty stars celebrate George Wein with Mike Rodriguez, Steve Davis, Jimmy Greene, Bill Cunliffe, Dave Stryker, Todd Coolman and Dennis Mackrel

More from The Daily Gazette:

Categories: Entertainment, Life and Arts

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This Tucson Festival Is Ready To Feature Black Artists | Music https://kmjazz.com/this-tucson-festival-is-ready-to-feature-black-artists-music/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 18:15:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/this-tucson-festival-is-ready-to-feature-black-artists-music/ From left to right, MoLaflo, Aske, Cash Lansky, Zora Thomas, Pheo and Fiona Fenix. The six artists will perform at different events during the Black Renaissance festival. Alanna Airitam Performances featuring black artists based in southern Arizona, spanning spoken word, hip-hop, jazz and visual arts, will take place at venues around Tucson this month as […]]]>




From left to right, MoLaflo, Aske, Cash Lansky, Zora Thomas, Pheo and Fiona Fenix. The six artists will perform at different events during the Black Renaissance festival.


Alanna Airitam


Performances featuring black artists based in southern Arizona, spanning spoken word, hip-hop, jazz and visual arts, will take place at venues around Tucson this month as part of the Black Renaissance festival.

The events, meant to coincide with Black History Month, will be the first to be held as part of the festival since early 2020, before the pandemic hit.

Festival founder and curator, musician Seanloui Dumas held no live events last year, opting instead to produce a series of podcasts and other forms of online content promoting black artists across the board. Arizona (you can hear the pods and get more details on upcoming events at blackrenaissance.online).

But Dumas, who launched the festival series in 2019, said people were eager to get back to live shows.

“That celebratory energy, the energy of coming together with one purpose, it’s something very electric,” he explained.

Among the planned activities:

A free spoken word event from 7-10 p.m., Saturday, February 12, at & Gallery, 419 N. Fourth Ave. The evening will feature several spoken word artists, including Larry Moore, Ms. Redd and headliner Zora Thomas.

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Orange County Black History Parade and Unity Festival Return to Anaheim https://kmjazz.com/orange-county-black-history-parade-and-unity-festival-return-to-anaheim/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 15:19:46 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/orange-county-black-history-parade-and-unity-festival-return-to-anaheim/ After a 2021 pandemic hiatus, the Orange County Black History Parade and Unity Festival will return to downtown Anaheim on Saturday. The Orange County Heritage Board will lead the 42n/a annual parade themed “Our Heritage: Reflect, Advance and Unite,” beginning at 9:00 a.m. with a parade pre-show and opening prayer. After the morning blessing, the […]]]>

After a 2021 pandemic hiatus, the Orange County Black History Parade and Unity Festival will return to downtown Anaheim on Saturday. The Orange County Heritage Board will lead the 42n/a annual parade themed “Our Heritage: Reflect, Advance and Unite,” beginning at 9:00 a.m. with a parade pre-show and opening prayer.

After the morning blessing, the parade will begin at 10 a.m., beginning at Anaheim Boulevard and Lincoln Avenue, and marching toward Water Street before returning to Anaheim City Hall. The parade will feature marching bands, floats, community units and dignitaries.

The parade will be followed by a Unity Festival, formerly known as the Cultural Fair, starting at noon. The festival will feature live music and entertainment, food, vendors, a college fair and an art competition. Grand Marshal 2022, R&B singer Kenny Lattimore, is set to speak and perform a selection of his music. R&B historian Tyrone Dubose and model Ashley Nicole host the show.

The city of Anaheim has hosted the OC Black History Parade since 2011. It has become an iconic tradition celebrating the diversity and richness of black culture. According to the 2020 census, Anaheim has the largest black population in the county. Census data indicates that nearly 350,000 of the county’s 3 million black people live in Anaheim.

The OC Black History Parade was founded by the late Helen M. Shipp and celebrated 40 years in 2020. This local tradition began in 1980 in Santa Ana and saw an increasing number of participants, resulting in the relocation of the parade in Anaheim. His son, CHC President Dwayne “BH” Shipp, has carried on the parade’s legacy over the past few years.

In addition to typical family, fun and food, the event will provide the community with free COVID-19 vaccines and testing along with a health village, Shipp said. There will be three stages with entertainers and motivational speakers, he said.

The first stage, the Freedom Stage, will host jazz, gospel, R&B, motivational speakers and comedians. Among the artists scheduled are comedian Dexter Smiles, gospel singer Maurice Griffin and rapper Knoc-turn’al. The second and third stages, the James Weldon stage and the We Up Next stage, will be the youth and hip-hop stages. The youth scene is sponsored by Vans and Maserati Shellz will host the hip-hop scene.

In addition to COVID-19-related services and entertainment, the festival will host a virtual college fair, exhibitors, information booths, religious organizations, community resources and delicious ethnic food, Shipp said. Among the list of food vendors are Santa Ana Redds, Endless Eats, Word of Faith, and Pucker Up Lemonade.

The OCHC canceled the parade and festival last year very cautiously because COVID-19 cases were on the rise at the time, Shipp said.

“We had to be safe. It wasn’t just about the parade; it was about our humanity,” he said. “The world was going through something. We all needed each other. Even Disneyland wasn’t open; we couldn’t have a parade.

“It wouldn’t have been smart to have a parade in the mass of a peak,” he added.

Shipp said the 2020 Black History Parade saw around 14,000 people in attendance. While he acknowledges that these numbers predated the pandemic, he hopes and encourages everyone to step out and be a part of history this year, regardless of race, color or ethnicity.

“Our organization is ‘The Legacy Never Ends…New Vines Grow from Strong Roots.’ I’m a vine from the root my mother put down. I’m just continuing our community work that she started,” Shipp said. “Our mission is to serve our community.”

Those unable to attend on Saturday or wishing to learn more about the parade’s 40-year history can visit Santa Ana’s creative studio to view the OC Black History Parade archival exhibit. The exhibit is supported in part by the California Arts Council, and archives and images are courtesy of the Shipp family and OCHC.

42nd Annual OC Black History Parade and Festival of Unity

When: 9 am morning blessings; 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., parade; 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., Unity Festival. Saturday 5 February.

Or: 305 W. Center Street Promenade, Anaheim

Tickets: To free

Contact: oc-hc.org714-579-9966

The exhibition will have an art walk after the parade this Saturday from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Regular show hours are Thursdays and Fridays 4-8pm, Saturdays 12-4pm and by appointment on all other dates and times.

The exhibition will have a closing reception on Saturday, February 26 from 2-5 p.m. The last day to view collected photographs, videos, newspaper articles and artifacts from the event will be February 26.

“It’s a visual journey. It takes you back through the story to 1980, the start of the parade, and how it went through the community,” Shipp said. “You can’t have history without artifacts.”

Muzeo in downtown Anaheim will also feature artwork from the Orange County Heritage Council Youth Art Contest in its Studio gallery. And in the Kabel de Muzeo gallery, additional arches will illustrate the theme of the parade, “Our heritage: reflect, advance, unite”.

The exhibitions will be on view until March 20. Visit muzeo.org for more details.

Emily Melgar is a writing intern for Voice of OC. She can be contacted at emily.melg@gmail.com.

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Songs by P. Ramlee, Noh Salleh, Yuna and other Malaysian artists transcribed into sheet music in the new Real Book https://kmjazz.com/songs-by-p-ramlee-noh-salleh-yuna-and-other-malaysian-artists-transcribed-into-sheet-music-in-the-new-real-book/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 05:44:02 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/songs-by-p-ramlee-noh-salleh-yuna-and-other-malaysian-artists-transcribed-into-sheet-music-in-the-new-real-book/ Songs by P. Ramlee, Sudirman, Noh Salleh and other Malaysian artists have been transcribed into sheet music in the new Malaysian real pound. A project of the Malaysian Jazz Piano Festival Committee, this Real Book – a term for a compilation of lead sheets for jazz standards – compiles lead sheets of a total of […]]]>

Songs by P. Ramlee, Sudirman, Noh Salleh and other Malaysian artists have been transcribed into sheet music in the new Malaysian real pound.

A project of the Malaysian Jazz Piano Festival Committee, this Real Book – a term for a compilation of lead sheets for jazz standards – compiles lead sheets of a total of 240 songs by Malaysian artists, complete with melody, chords and notations for musicians to read and play.

Led by Michael Veerapen, founder of the Malaysian Jazz Piano Festival and renowned jazz pianist, the Malaysian real pound features a selection of songs ranging from iconic works by the legendary P. Ramlee and Sudirman to more contemporary artists like Yuna, Dasha Logan, Seven Collar T-Shirt and Hujan frontman Noh Salleh. There is even a healthy representation of metal songs by bands Sekumpulan Orang Gila, Cromok and others.

“Our goal was to transcribe songs that 50 to 100 years from now will have some value in Malaysian culture,” selection committee member Rizal Ezuan Zulkifly Tony told a press conference earlier this month. . “We did a thorough check to see if these songs will have an impact on the future.”

To that end, the 240 songs chosen encompass pre-Merdeka works, dondang sayang, yeh yeh pop, kapak rock and folk tunes alongside music from prominent artists in the local music scene in today. Featured in the Real Book are Manbai’s iconic anthem “Kau Ilhamku”, Bihzhu’s blues masterpiece “Tainted Temples”, P. Ramlee’s classic “Tunggu Sekejap”, Search’s perennial favorite “Isabella ‘, the traditional Kenyah community folk song ‘Liling’, the children’s folk tune ‘Geylang Si Paku Geylang’ and many more.

Despite the gender diversity Malaysian real poundrap and hip-hop songs are absent because “playability was a factor,” said Rizual Ezuan.

Seven Collar T-Shirt guitarist Muhammad Abdullah, better known as Ham, said NME the band were “very proud” to have their alternative rock single “Fragile” chosen for the Real Book. “We think this is a great start to documenting local music. Historically, we also view this as a reward, being recognized by the industry for our efforts in 2009 with ‘The Great Battle’.

The book was compiled over a period of one and a half years. The Malaysian jazz piano festival committee initially reviewed popular songs on Spotify, Veerapen said NMEbefore deciding that simply transcribing popular songs “wouldn’t be an accurate snapshot of Malaysian music”.

The committee then decided to sort the songs into weighted categories like East Malaysian, Chinese, and Indian music, and by genres like metal, indie, R&B, jazz, and traditional folk songs.

When creating the Real Book, the committee had to sort out several copyright issues, negotiating behind the scenes with 12 to 15 different publishers to ensure royalties were paid accordingly. Due to uneven accounting practices for several of the classic tunes selected for the book, some publishers even challenged the rights to certain songs, leading the committee to resolve various counterclaims (at the press conference, committee members declined to name specific songs and publishers.).

However, the publishers eventually agreed to receive the same amount per song transcribed, thanks in part to veteran event manager and Malaysian music advocate Jennifer Thompson, who brought parties with conflicting claims to the table so that negotiations can be completed.

“There has never been a deal like this in terms of royalties,” claimed Malaysian real pound editor-in-chief, Dr. Adil Johan. “This book is unique. All publishers have given permission to release the rights to publish this book.

the Malaysian real pound is currently available for purchase at MYR 150 as a limited edition physical book (excluding MYR 10 delivery charge) and MYR 100 for a read-only electronic copy, with all proceeds going to the Malaysian’s organization Jazz Piano Festival. Individual lead sheets are not available for purchase at this time, although the committee is considering eventually selling individual lead sheets.

The committee intends to make the Malaysian real pound available to higher education establishments as a reference for contemporary music and jazz, and will consider a second edition of the Real Book depending on the reception given to the first.

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Five artists to see at Gem & Jam 2022 https://kmjazz.com/five-artists-to-see-at-gem-jam-2022/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 15:28:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/five-artists-to-see-at-gem-jam-2022/ Photo credit: Sincerity Photos Gem & Jam is on the horizon and there are some sensational artists on the lineup that you simply must see at this year’s edition! Gem & Jam amounts to Tucson, AZ for its 14th year this year, making it one of Arizona’s oldest festivals. The three-day festival will once again […]]]>

Photo credit: Sincerity Photos


Gem & Jam is on the horizon and there are some sensational artists on the lineup that you simply must see at this year’s edition!


Gem & Jam amounts to Tucson, AZ for its 14th year this year, making it one of Arizona’s oldest festivals. The three-day festival will once again take place at Pima County Fairgrounds to February 4-6featuring over 90 artists, live painters and gemstone sellers from around the world.

The Gem & Jam lineup always offers a variety of sounds to explore from artists across all genres. Whether you’re a fan of jam bands, bass music, house grooves or even something more melodic, this festival has a genre for everyone. While headlining artists like Claude VonStroke, Liquid Stranger, Shpongle and Lotus are sure to drop, there’s also plenty more to explore. Read on to discover some gems that came out of the lineup this year!

Be sure to grab your tickets today, via SeeTickets.us, and don’t stop here, be sure to listen to our curated playlist to really fuel up!

Five artists to discover at the Gem & Jam Festival 2022


Gem & Jam 2018
STS9 | Photo credit: Sincerity Photos

STS9

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the Sound Tribe Sector 9otherwise known as STS9, is an electronic group mixing elements of rock, hip-hop, funk, jazz and even drum and bass. Since 1998, STS9 has released 11 albums, touring the world with recent headlining appearances at festivals like Bonnaroo, Electric Forest, Suwanee Hulaween, and even Gem and Jam in 2018!

Not only do STS9 go wild when they perform, but they care directly about their communities. Throughout their career, they’ve partnered with nonprofits like Conscious Alliance, bringing food drives to all of their tour stops. They raised money for Hurricane Katrina Relief and ran a carbon offset campaign to offset their carbon emissions while on tour. STS9 credits their community activism to their friends and fans who constantly inspire them.

In an STS9 set you will find vibrant electronic sounds mixed with talented musicians who know a musical instrument really well. Their last album, The universe inside, showcases the diversity of their sound by seamlessly integrating disco styles. This set will be all the hype, you won’t want to miss it.


SunSquabi

SunSquabi

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This funk-loving trio hails from Boulder, Colorado and plays some of the most mind-blowing combinations of jazz, electro and dubstep. Their 2011 debut included live drums, keyboards, guitar, bass and a good deal of production. After a few independent EPs, they caught the attention of Detroit’s All Good Records. The label is run by GRiZ and helped SunSquabi release their debut album, Odysseyin 2016.

SunSquabi’s album ended up being just the breakthrough they needed. Their popularity exploded and they began a national tour appearing at festivals like Okeechobee, Elements and Electric Forest. Known for their insanely funky tunes – if you’re a fan of funk, bass and dirty grooves, this set is for you.


Daily bread

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Hailing from the east side of Atlanta, Daily Bread strives to incorporate creative and unique samples into their tracks. His unique sound has earned him the attention of the festival scene and he has gone from just playing Sonic Bloom to hosting a Bread and Breakfast event over the past two years. He has long considered Denver his second home and credits that feeling to the incredible electronic hip-hop artists that have spawned there as well as the thriving music scene.

Seeing Daily Bread perform always leads to memories that stand out, and his next set at Gem & Jam is sure to continue that trend. His energy and the samples he uses are familiar while providing layers you wouldn’t expect. Don’t miss this unique experience!


Bingo Bango gambling function
Photo credit: Solo Visuals

Bingo Bango

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Nathan DeGour, more affectionately known as Bingo Bango, is a California native who began his music journey playing in a high school band. Throughout high school, he played in various bands, playing bass and guitar, and was even the lead singer of a Screamo band. His passion for music really started to blossom when he discovered festivals and electronic music. The performing culture is what really inspired him, he knew he wanted to be around the music all the time which led him to Phoenix, AZ.

Since moving to Arizona, Bingo Bango has become heavily involved with the local music collective, idgaFNK making regular appearances at their micro-festivals. He is drawn to the combination of songs that sound familiar to him mixed with modern tunes and heavy basslines. In this set, you’ll hear songs you know all the words to smash them with headbanging tunes. While Bingo Bango is still working on his production skills, his understanding of sound combinations that work in unexpected ways will put him on the map.


Sponges at MVS day
Photo credit: Sincerity Photos

sponges

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sponges is comprised of two dynamic minds, Ryan Slepin and Nik Eaton. These South Florida-based artists were friends who simply discovered their passion for music together and have been racing since. Their signature sound that infuses 70s funk with heavy bass and classic house beats has taken them to the top of the Beatport charts multiple times and they are only going to get bigger.

While the Sponges’ own releases caught on, they also caught the attention of Kyle Watson and together they created The Ratchet Express to further deepen their discography. Moreover, they have been praised by big hitters in the scene such as Ardalan, Taiki Nulight, etc. Their upbeat and groovy tracks will have you tearing up the dance floor. Be sure to listen to all of their tracks below and don’t sleep on this set if you want to dance!


Connect with Gem & Jam Festival on social media:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | instagram

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