singer songwriter – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 08:51:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kmjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-53-120x120.png singer songwriter – KM Jazz http://kmjazz.com/ 32 32 Quebec Music Festival faces backlash for not including female artists, headliner pulls out https://kmjazz.com/quebec-music-festival-faces-backlash-for-not-including-female-artists-headliner-pulls-out/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 01:41:57 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/quebec-music-festival-faces-backlash-for-not-including-female-artists-headliner-pulls-out/ A Quebec summer music festival with an all-male lineup has lost at least one big name and is being criticized for ignoring female artists. The backlash began online and intensified after popular singer-songwriter Emile Bilodeau announced he had dropped out of the 16th edition of Festi-Plage in Cap-d’Espoir, Gaspésie, Quebec. Bilodeau said Wednesday that not […]]]>

A Quebec summer music festival with an all-male lineup has lost at least one big name and is being criticized for ignoring female artists.

The backlash began online and intensified after popular singer-songwriter Emile Bilodeau announced he had dropped out of the 16th edition of Festi-Plage in Cap-d’Espoir, Gaspésie, Quebec.

Bilodeau said Wednesday that not just artists, but everyone in the music industry, including festival organizers, has a role to play in increasing female representation. He said he couldn’t participate in an event that didn’t share his values.

“I work with amazing women and learned my trade from the best,” Bilodeau said in a statement on Facebook. “In fact, it is thanks to them that I am the artist, and above all, the man that I am today.”

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Festi-Plage, which will be held from July 27 to 30, will present a variety of musical genres, including Quebec folk, rap and funk. The 14 artists featured are all male, with the exception of Les Cowboys Fringants, a four-person band with one woman.

Festival organizer Ghislain Pitre said Thursday he was disappointed by Bilodeau’s reaction and surprised by the critics.

“We didn’t see it coming,” Pitre said in an interview. “We have Les Cowboys Fringants; we are not 100% exclusively male. He said one of the artists, comedian PA Methot, is also putting on a performance that will include women.

Pitre, however, said he was unable to find a single female musician or majority-female band available that had a festival-aligned musical style.

“We are not against women; we looked at who was available and what best suited our clientele,” he said, adding that the festival would replace Bilodeau with a female artist.

“We are a festive festival; we are not an emerging music festival. People are on the beach, they are dancing, they are drinking beer. This is not a piano concert.

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Fannie Crépin, co-founder of Musique Bleue — a group that promotes Quebec music — says she finds Pitre’s explanation outdated and inexcusable.

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Crépin said he asked a friend earlier this week to create a playlist of female Quebec artists, “from every musical style possible,” to celebrate International Women’s Day.

“It took less than an hour and she came back with a hundred names,” Crepin said in an interview Thursday.

Crépin hailed Bilodeau’s decision and called it a first in Quebec, saying she couldn’t remember a time when a male artist pulled out of a show due to a lack of performers. feminine.

“We’ve been asking for it for so long,” Crépin said. “Despite our efforts to promote women, do we still see a lot of impact when men react to inequalities? When men say they are allies but don’t act on them, we go around in circles.

Crepin lamented the under-representation of women on commercial radio playlists and at festivals. She echoed Bilodeau’s comments and said the music industry must work to change that reality.

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She also called on the provincial government to stop funding festivals that do not meet gender parity requirements. “Festivals have become the main showcase for artists, so when they do something like that, it really hurts,” Crepin said.

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“If festivals don’t book women, neither do labels. Someone, somewhere has to make the effort at some point.

Sebastien Fournier, director of the Festi Jazz international de Rimouski, a festival located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, north of Quebec, agrees with Crepin. He said the industry needed to start believing that audiences could enjoy a wider variety of artists than what is aired on the radio.

“Just because the artist isn’t included by major commercial radio doesn’t mean good music isn’t going to draw a crowd,” Fournier said in an interview Thursday. “There are enough female artists to be headliners, you just need to have vision and creativity.”

Pitre, however, said his audience prefers well-known artists. “We book who’s popular,” he said. “Our audience is regional and broad, we are not in Montreal where you can find an emerging artist.”

But Fournier, who booked artists for the popular Sea Shack inn in Gaspé, Quebec, for seven years before joining Festi Jazz, said the curiosity was there.

“Sometimes you have to realize that people are already there; there is an event, so let’s give some artists a chance,” he said.

© 2022 The Canadian Press

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Jazz Sundays at the Falcon will feature world-class artists every week until June https://kmjazz.com/jazz-sundays-at-the-falcon-will-feature-world-class-artists-every-week-until-june/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:31:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/jazz-sundays-at-the-falcon-will-feature-world-class-artists-every-week-until-june/ The Falcon, a community-minded arts mecca in the Hudson Valley hamlet of Marlboro, NY, has endured every type of challenge an independent venue could face over the past two years, managing better than most. Then came the passing of Tony Falco, its visionary founder, last fall. For the club and its distant but tight-knit music […]]]>

The Falcon, a community-minded arts mecca in the Hudson Valley hamlet of Marlboro, NY, has endured every type of challenge an independent venue could face over the past two years, managing better than most. Then came the passing of Tony Falco, its visionary founder, last fall. For the club and its distant but tight-knit music community, it was a devastating loss that also raised worried questions about the future.

But the fate of The Falcon is in safe and steady hands – with Tony’s son, Lee Falco, an accomplished drummer and producer who grew up with a revolving door of world-class artists in his backyard. “It’s really been a roller coaster ride, and it’s still going,” Lee says of his experience as a venue owner during our volatile moment. “It’s only the first weekend we’ve reopened, really, since my dad passed away.” He adds, “I’m just looking and trying things out, trying to be open to all kinds of possibilities with the place, and really trying to do whatever it takes to make it happen. everything continues.”

With that in mind, The Falcon has just announced Jazz Sundays, a new series in collaboration with friend and Hudson Valley resident Danny Melnick of Absolutely Live Entertainment. Beginning this Sunday with a Mardi Gras celebration featuring irrepressible New Orleans trombonist and singer Glen David Andrews, it will run through June – with a boost from funds Melnick secured through a grant for Vaulted Site Operators (SVOG), which provides emergency assistance to eligible sites affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

After attending a memorial for Tony Falco last fall, Melnick began asking Lee about the situation at the Falcon. “It occurred to me as we were discussing this, throughout the fall and winter, that I had this SVO money that I could probably contribute. And so part of my desire to get involved – knowing that I couldn’t earn money and didn’t really care about earning money – was that I was able to bring not only my contacts and knowledge, but also some money to the musicians, and sweeten the pot for them to make it all a little more exciting coming out of Omicron.

Glen David Andrews.jpeg

Under SVOG’s strict eligibility guidelines, The Falcon — which has made it a point to never charge admission for its shows — is classified as a restaurant rather than a live music venue. So it’s especially helpful that Melnick found the grant useful: In addition to booking Jazz Sundays, he’ll use those funds to pay each band a $500 guarantee. As has always been the case at The Falcon, performers will also receive 100% of public donations at the door.

A look at bookings suggests the same high artistic caliber and stylistic breadth that Melnick brings to the Freihofer Jazz Festival in Saratoga every summer. Among the star attractions: Trion by drummer Johnathan Blake, with Linda May Han Oh on bass and Chris Potter on saxophones (March 13); a celebration of the 82nd birthday of tenor saxophonist Lew Tabackin (March 27); an album release show for the Michael Leonhart Orchestra The Norman Suites (April 3); and another album release show, for Jeremy Pelt’s Soundtrack (April 24).

Next weekend’s offering will be Universal Spirits Ensemble by Tim Ries, named after his 1998 album on the Criss Cross label. “So far, we’ve only performed live with this band at The Carter Center for a speech given by President Carter: A Time For Peace,” says Ries, a saxophonist widely known for his association with the Rolling Stones. (He adds in an email that the band are busy rehearsing this week in preparation for the gig.)

For Melnick, who moved to the Hudson Valley over the past decade, Jazz Sundays is not only a sign of support for The Falcon, but also a tribute to the example set by Tony Falco. The implications of this move are not lost on Lee, who often worked with Melnick’s wife, singer-songwriter Bari Koral.

“To me, continuing in my dad’s spirit is kind of a bigger picture,” says Lee. “And so many people in the community love my dad and have reached out and are ready to help, and I feel very supported. And I haven’t felt that more than with Danny and his help here. It’s special, and it’s really appreciated right now.

Below, find the program of Jazz Sundays. See The Falcon for more information.

Jazz Sundays.jpeg

Jazz Sundays at the Falcon

February
2/27: Mardis Gras Celebration at Glen David Andrews

March
03/06/22: Tim Ries Universal Spirits Set
03/13/22: Johnathan Blake Trio with Chris Potter and Linda May Han Oh
3/20/22: Younger Brandee
03/27/22: Lew Tabackin’s 82nd birthday

April
03/04/22: The Michael Leonhart Orchestra
04/10/22: Brianna Thomas
4/17/22: Aaron Parks
04/24/22: Jeremy Pelt

May
05/01/22: Orrin Evans Trio
5/8/22: Adam O’Farrill’s Stranger Days
05/15/22: Samara Joy with Pasquale Grasso Trio
05/22/22: Sasha Dobson with Peter Bernstein
05/29/22: Richie Goods & The Goods Project

June
05/06/22: Olatuja: a musical meeting
06/12/22: Pilc Moutin Hoenig
6/19/22: Kat Edmonson
06/26/22: The Ben Allison Quartet

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Top jazz musicians gather for the coveted MVA Jazz Festival https://kmjazz.com/top-jazz-musicians-gather-for-the-coveted-mva-jazz-festival/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 08:52:45 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/top-jazz-musicians-gather-for-the-coveted-mva-jazz-festival/ The Enrique Oliver jazz ensemble will perform at the festival. / ON A series of jazz concerts will take place in Malaga, Torremolinos, Ronda, Alhaurín de la Torre and Nerja The MVA Jazz Festival, an event that brings together the best national and international jazz musicians in venues throughout the province of Malaga, started on […]]]>

The Enrique Oliver jazz ensemble will perform at the festival. / ON

A series of jazz concerts will take place in Malaga, Torremolinos, Ronda, Alhaurín de la Torre and Nerja

Tony Bryant

The MVA Jazz Festival, an event that brings together the best national and international jazz musicians in venues throughout the province of Malaga, started on Thursday and will continue until Friday, March 18.

Many world famous artists will create exclusive bands with musicians from Malaga and the rest of Spain especially for the occasion.

The concerts will take place at the María Victoria Atencia (MVA) Cultural Center in Malaga, as well as venues in Torremolinos, Ronda, Alhaurín de la Torre and Nerja.

The festival is closely linked to the Alhaurín de la Torre International Jazz Seminar – which celebrates its 18th anniversary this year – since many of the artists who teach the classes at the seminar will perform the festival concerts.

The event will feature American artists Kikoski, Bobby Broom, Victor Lewis and Essie Okon, as well as musicians such as José Carra, Enrique Oliver and Daniel Torres from Malaga.

American pianist Kikoski won a Grammy Award in 2011 with the Mingus Big Band for Best Live Jazz Ensemble Album. He has an extensive discography as a bandleader and has toured the world performing at top jazz festivals.

Bobby Broom was weaned on the guitar heritage of musicians like Wes Montgomery and Grant Green. He studied at Berklee College of Music, then returned to New York, where he worked with jazz funk trumpeter Tom Browne and Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. In the early 80s, he shared the stage with Sonny Rollins, Kenny Burrell and Miles Davis.

Among the artists programmed at the festival are also Portuguese musicians such as João Pereira, Romeu Tristão and Ricardo Toscano; with a group made up of musicians from Cadiz, Barcelona and Valencia. Other ensembles include Little Monster, a group made up of young students from the Alhaurín de la Torre School of Music and Dance.

There will also be a special performance by Cuban saxophonist Inoidel González, who will team up with famous Japanese pianist Atsuko Shimada and famous double bassist Romeu Tristäo.

Some of the highlights of the festival include a concert in which Salvador Sobral, the Portuguese singer and songwriter who won the Eurovision Song Contest in 2017, will join a sextet of musicians from Malaga on Friday the 4th (today) at the MVA; the performance at the MVA (March 5) by the Jesse Davis Quintet, an up-and-coming jazz musician from New Orleans; and the Jam Session Big Band concert in the municipal park of Alhaurín de la Torre on Sunday, March 6.

Tickets for all performances, which are free, can be downloaded at www.mientrada.net

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Lisa Kocay’s Top 10 Songs by Black Artists https://kmjazz.com/lisa-kocays-top-10-songs-by-black-artists/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 22:26:42 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/lisa-kocays-top-10-songs-by-black-artists/ From top left to bottom right: Carl Cox (courtesy of Carl Cox), Moore Kismet (courtesy of Moore … [+] Kismet), Honey Dijon (courtesy of Ricardo Gomez), DJ Minx (courtesy of Joe Gall) and Black Coffee (courtesy of Alari Teede). Carl Cox (courtesy of Carl Cox), Moore Kismet (courtesy of Moore Kismet), Honey Dijon (courtesy of […]]]>

Celebrate Black History Month by supporting black creatives. Buy their music, stream their songs, share their stories, showcase their talents and more. Dance music was born out of black culture, and this is too often forgotten as the genre has gone white.

Remember the roots of dance music by granting black excellence through various genres of dance music. My top 10 tracks include everything from house to techno, dubstep, African house and more.

Let these songs follow not only your Black History Month, but also your daily life.

“Intimidated (with ELLE)” —Kaytranada

Kaytranada stuns fans with “Intimidated,” featuring singer-songwriter HER Boasting captivating vocals, heart-pounding bass underpinned by soothing production, and sounds meant to encourage applause, the record is turns out to be masterfully produced. Kaytranada won Best Dance/Electronic Album for BOUBA at the first ceremony of the 63rd GRAMMY Awards. Previously, he also won the GRAMMY for Best Dance Recording for “10%” with Kali Uchis.

“Rumor” —Moore Kismet

Moore Kismet impresses music lovers with “Rumors”. The record proves to be texturally varied, with everything from percolating beats to shimmering synths, enchanting vocals and airy production that leads to eerie bass. The 17-year-old producer performed at the Electric Daisy Carnival in 2021, making him the youngest producer to perform at the famous festival.

“We are a” —Carl Cox

“We Are One” begins with a monologue from Carl Cox detailing his desire to play his soulful music influenced by the genres that got him to where he is today. Then the record turns into a beautiful, happy and loud production. Carl Cox is considered an acid house veteran, techno champion and dance music pioneer.

“Voice Messaging” – Green velvet

Taste pioneer Green Velvet, part of the second wave of influential house artists, stuns with “Voicemail.” The 2014 track, created with Patrick Topping, offers catchy vocals, bouncy basslines, voicemail clips of people asking for favors, woozy synths and more, creating what has become an anthemic record. Green Velvet’s career began over 25 years ago and he is the founder of Relief Records. The underground artist is well known for his quirky green mohawk.

“Ready for You (feat. Celeste)” – Black coffee

The godfather of South African house music, Black Coffee, delivers a moving production with “Ready for You”. The haunting track features raw vocals, heavenly production and the artist’s South African house flair. The disc is part of Black Coffee’s second 12-track album, Unconsciously.

“Paradise” —HoneyLuv

Rock out to bass-heavy house in HoneyLuv’s “Paradise.” The track features seductive lyrics and sultry production. HoneyLuv is known for her influences on the house, techno and hip hop and RnB scenes.

“We don’t play” — 12th Planet

Headbangers, prepare your neck braces. Tune in for fast rapping, sample sounds from other artists, an awesome showcase of various synths, and what can only be described as gross bass. 12th Planet is the boss of the label SMOG Records. The artist is considered one of the first ambassadors of dubstep in the United States following his co-signings of Skream and Rusko and a report on Diplo’s blow your mind compilation.

“Work (feat. Dave Giles II, Cor. Ece & Mike Dunn)” — Dijon honey

The Chicago-born artist brings the funk with “Work.” The sultry track features jazz, catchy lyrics and powerful lyrics, bouncy production and more, creating a record designed for pure dancefloor elation. The record is taken from the next Honey Dijon black girl magic album.

“We are all moving forward together” — Downtown and Idris Elba

“We All Move Together” features an inspiring and powerful monologue by Idris Elba about the history of dance music and Inner City founder Kevin Saunderson’s contributions to the evolution of the genre as he is considered the one of the ancestors of techno. Indeed, the track is done in true Inner City style as it is meaningful, moving and uplifting. The song comes from the recently released Detroit electronic band’s first album in 30 years, We all move together.

“Queendom” — DJ Minx

DJ Minx’s “Queendom” keeps the funk alive. With productions of African house and flashing synths, it delivers tons of sonic sparkle. The entertainer is a long-time fixture of Detroit’s club scene, and she’s often called the wax first lady. She’s known for doing everything from deep, minimal music to fiery, funky music.

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Edinburgh Connect Music Festival: first wave of artists announced https://kmjazz.com/edinburgh-connect-music-festival-first-wave-of-artists-announced/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 11:46:33 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/edinburgh-connect-music-festival-first-wave-of-artists-announced/ Connect Music Festival has announced the first wave of its lineup for this summer’s event, with Massive Attack, The Chemical Brothers and The National headlining. Connect is a brand new festival experience that will feature top left-field talent, from grassroots artists to big-name headliners – the festival will re-launch from August 26-28 at the Royal […]]]>

Connect Music Festival has announced the first wave of its lineup for this summer’s event, with Massive Attack, The Chemical Brothers and The National headlining.

Connect is a brand new festival experience that will feature top left-field talent, from grassroots artists to big-name headliners – the festival will re-launch from August 26-28 at the Royal Highland Center in Edinburgh.

The National | Graham MacIndoe

Other names announced so far include Mogwai, Little Simz, Self Esteem, Jon Hopkins, Black Coffee, Bonobo, Bombay Bicycle Club, John Grant, LOW and Idlewild.

Music fans can get their early bird ticket by registering for access to the Connect presale before 9:00 a.m. Thursday, before tickets go on sale during the general release at 9:00 a.m. Friday.

Bristol collective Massive Attack take to the Grand Parade stage on Friday 26th August, while electronic dance music giants The Chemical Brothers headline Connect on Saturday 27th.

Ending the weekend and closing out Connect with their headline set for Sunday the 28th will be The National.

Additionally, British jazz drummer Moses Boyd, Glasgow trio Cloth, 2021 Sound of Young Scotland award winner Lvra, legendary Optimo (Espacio) and Future Utopia, Maeve and Hammer will be among the artists performing first. Connect day.

The National: recent British award winner Little Simz will take the stage on SundayRecent Brit Award winner Little Simz will take the stage on Sunday

On Sunday the 27th, acclaimed Scottish band Mogwai, who won Scottish Album of the Year last year for their tenth studio album As the Love Continues, will take to the stage at the Grand Parade.

Formed in Glasgow in 1995, Mogwai are known for their legendary concerts. They will be joined by recent Brit Award winner Little Simz and five-star review queen Self Esteem.

The National: Mogwai won Scottish Album of the Year in 2021Mogwai won Scottish Album of the Year in 2021

Another addition to Sunday’s line-up are independent festival favorites Bombay Bicycle Club. They will be joined by local heroes, Edinburgh-based Scottish rock band Idlewild, who will perform their acclaimed album The Remote Part.

Glasgow music collective Admiral Fallow, American singer and violinist Sudan Archives, indie rock band Dehd, Scottish singer-songwriters Hamish Hawk and Lizzie Reid, Bristol-based singer-songwriter Kathleen Francis will perform also on Sunday 28.

The National: Admiral Fallow will perform on Sunday, August 28Admiral Fallow will perform on Sunday August 28

DF Concerts & Events CEO Geoff Ellis said, “We are delighted to announce our lineup for Connect today. For some time now, we’ve been working tirelessly and carefully to curate an exciting lineup for the first edition of our new iteration of Connect and we’re really excited to share it.

“While Connect is an entirely new festival proposition, it will retain many of the qualities – and spirit – of its 2007 and 2008 namesake, particularly in terms of music, entertainment, food and drink programming.

He added: “We look forward to welcoming fans to the Royal Highland Showgrounds in August.”

Other artists will be added to the program in the weeks to come.

Visit the Connect website for more information.

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How five artists plan to revive culture in Toronto https://kmjazz.com/how-five-artists-plan-to-revive-culture-in-toronto/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 17:11:58 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/how-five-artists-plan-to-revive-culture-in-toronto/ Nearly two years after the pandemic put an end to live performance and artistic and cultural projects of all kinds, five artists are delighted to land a six-month residency with Luminato. The arts and culture festival, which returns to the in-person experience June 9-19, offers its new residents the opportunity to collaborate with other artists […]]]>

Nearly two years after the pandemic put an end to live performance and artistic and cultural projects of all kinds, five artists are delighted to land a six-month residency with Luminato.

The arts and culture festival, which returns to the in-person experience June 9-19, offers its new residents the opportunity to collaborate with other artists and explore their interests.

For some it is a chance to develop new projects, for others a timely lifeline after a long period of financial difficulties.

***

Ansley Simpson, an Aboriginal singer-songwriter from Alderville First Nation, calls the residency a “unique opportunity.”

“To have a residency program in the city where I live that allows me to take care of my daughter, that actually pays my bills, and that’s in my traditional territory as an Indigenous person, I really couldn’t ask for more. ,” Simpson said. “There were a lot of tears when I found out I had the spot, good tears.”

After the release of his debut album in 2018, work in the form of live performance with his band came to a shuddering halt. But Simpson used the time to take a long break and work at a studio producing long-form soundtracks as well as film scores.

“The performance brings a lot of joy and fun, but it’s also quite stressful and exhausting. The amount of work it takes to get your band ready, get yourself ready, get on stage, and keep that energy in the space is truly exhausting. What I learned initially (during the pandemic) was that I was exhausted and needed a deep rest,” she said.

Simpson’s next album, She Fell From the Sky – delayed by COVID – comes out in May, with the return to live performance.

“I miss my band, I miss playing and getting feedback from the public. So I’m looking forward to that. Playing outside is where I feel most comfortable,” he said. she stated.

She plans to put the coming months to good use.

“I hope I can afford to be an actual artist without the financial worries weighing me down. So I can go out and explore the city with my sound recording equipment. Six months doesn’t seem like a long time, but it’s “is a luxurious time for an artist. I don’t know many people who have the opportunity to immerse themselves and work on their passion projects.”

Candice Dixon

***

Costume designer Candice Dixon grew up in Scarborough and for her and her family, the Toronto Caribbean Carnival, formerly known as Caribana, was a joyful annual summer event.

“Carnival has always been a really big thing for me, going with my grandma every year, she was always really excited about it,” Dixon said.

But it wasn’t until after many years of studying fashion and working in the corporate world that Dixon decided to return to her roots and become a full-time costume designer and carnival practitioner.

“I ended up working at a company for a long time, but I never really felt connected to it. I worked for a huge company. There were 3,000 people in the company, and I was probably one of about 20 black people working there, so I never really felt like I belonged,” Dixon recalled.

Dixon said she “fallen” into costume design in 2010 and started her own company, SugaCayne.

” I had never thought about it. I always went to Carnival and loved it, but I never thought it was something I could actually do. I remember that first year in mas camp, where we design and produce the costumes, and the whole community comes in and you just become part of the fabric of the community. I fell where I belong and who I am. I just fell in love with it from there,” Dixon said.

When the pandemic hit, she had to postpone a plan to debut with a band in the carnival parade and find another job to make ends meet.

“It was tough, it put me in a dark place,” said Dixon, who has taken her art to events in Chicago, Miami, Trinidad and elsewhere.

Dixon said the residency gives him “a chance to have a gig and be with creatives again and an opportunity to connect. It’s been so hard to make connections over the past two years.

“Collaborating is always something that means a lot to me. I don’t do the art that I do in a silo. I work with groups of people and we bounce (ideas) off each other. I am so grateful for that,” she said.

Lisa Pijuan Nomura

***

For Lisa Pijuan-Nomura of Hamilton, a queer multidisciplinary artist whose interests include storytelling, live performance using movement and sound, and collage art – using vintage materials -.

When the pandemic hit, Pijuan-Nomura was in the hospital recovering from surgery.

“All my work, which is art and performance, disappeared overnight. We kept thinking it was going to be a month, oh it’s going to be three months. Suddenly I realized that I had to pivot. The thing that I learned was that we can do hard things,” she said.

That meant creating a website for the artist (who says she’s not tech-savvy), hosting online arts and crafts shows and art shows for Mighty Braves, a group that she founded, which sells the artwork of young people aged 8 to 18, and even teaches classes online.

“I’m able to do things I never thought I could do. You just keep going,” Piguan-Nomura said, adding that she’s developed a newfound respect for the digital world, including Zoom.

“A lot of people talk about Zoom fatigue. I’m also aware that all of these Zoom events have allowed people to attend events they might not have been able to attend. Even before the pandemic, it was obvious to me that there are people who aren’t at the table who should be at the table. As I get older, I really want to support people of my generation,” said Piguan-Nomura, 50.

As for the residency: “A six-month concert, what a gift! Having six months of support from Luminato is actually life changing. Working together with the Luminato team and the other artists is a gift,” she said.

Adeyemi Adegbesan

***

Adeyemi Adegbesan started making art again ten years ago, deciding to give up his career as a commercial photographer about five years ago to become a full-time artist focused on creating digital art and painting, especially the portrait.

“I had started to feel a bit exhausted in that I didn’t feel like I could really express the ideas and talk about the things I wanted to discuss through this work (the photography). I just decided to re-embrace all the things that excited and inspired me as a kid,” Adegbesan said, citing black culture, comics, fantasy and sports.

“A lot of these things had no place in what I was doing as a commercial photographer,” he added.

For Adegbesan, the pandemic has fueled his innate desire to be “quiet and off the radar”.

“I guess the pandemic gave me a little more time to reflect. It relieved a bit of the pressure to engage and be visible. As an artist, there’s a lot of pressure to be visible and accessible all the time,” he said.

And while Adegbesan’s art – he is entirely self-taught – has begun to provide him with a decent income, the residency presents a chance to mingle with other artists.

“It’s exciting because I see it as an opportunity to learn and expand my horizons. It’s really cool because as an artist, your main goal is to earn an income. Thus, many elements of personal development can be deprioritized. You don’t necessarily have time to step back to expand your knowledge base or try to learn new things,” he said.

As an artist, Adegbesan also wants to make her voice heard on behalf of the black community, those who have struggled to find a place in the world of the arts.

“It’s been a challenge as a black artist, especially when I was just starting out. I haven’t seen a lot of representation in the arts institutions in the city for artists like me. It’s been a challenge to find opportunities to mentorship and people to offer advice and help,” Adegbesan said.

“Now I’m in a position where my practice is continuous and self-sustaining, I want to be able to create opportunities for young black artists who come forward,” added.

Viv Moore

***

Viv Moore, a British immigrant, has been studying dance and movement since she started ballet at the age of 4. She has since studied jazz, tap, modern as well as other more exotic forms like butoh – a form of Japanese dance – along with stage combat, including learning to use a whip and a sword.

“I’ve been really, really eclectic in my creative choices. People can’t stick to me and I like that. I like challenges, I like looking for different ways to improve my movement vocabulary,” Moore said.

“Is it difficult to earn a living as an artist? It’s not difficult, I think it’s practically impossible. I cleaned toilets, I served tables, I erected scaffolding. I’ve done loads and loads of different things while doing gigs. Creativity never stops,” she said.

She performed around the world, worked as a choreographer and taught dance and movement at Humber College for 36 years before retiring last year, fed up with trying to teach via ZOOM.

“Those students were amazing, but how can you see what someone’s body is doing in that tiny little box? Bless their hearts. I loved teaching,” she said.

For Moore, a residency at Luminato is “gold.”

“I’m so, so grateful to be good at this. I could cry, it’s such an opportunity. In my 36 years teaching at Humber, I’ve never had an offer of more than four months. They (only) do four-month deals,” she said.

“The staff are so supportive. I feel like I can just lay down instead of being in this tiny little place I’ve been to. They said ‘dream big’ so I asked to meet Stevie Wonder,” she laughed.

Moore has only recently become comfortable disclosing her age and is determined to lend her voice and talents to create a better understanding of how society often makes older people feel “invisible.”

“I think it’s a rather aging society, especially for women. I realized several months ago that I wanted to talk about so many things but it means saying a date. So I thought oh shit, I’m just gonna come out and say it and it feels good. So I’m 70,” Moore said.

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6 artists you can’t miss at Noise Pop 2022 https://kmjazz.com/6-artists-you-cant-miss-at-noise-pop-2022/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 19:46:23 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/6-artists-you-cant-miss-at-noise-pop-2022/ Topaz Jones is more than a talented hip-hop artist, he’s on his way to becoming an author. With his album 2021 Don’t tell your mamahe co-directed a short film of the same name which won a Sundance Award and achieved wide release via The New York Times. Inspired by Black ABCs flashcards that two teachers […]]]>

Topaz Jones is more than a talented hip-hop artist, he’s on his way to becoming an author. With his album 2021 Don’t tell your mamahe co-directed a short film of the same name which won a Sundance Award and achieved wide release via The New York Times. Inspired by Black ABCs flashcards that two teachers developed in Chicago in the 70s, the film uses the alphabet as a storytelling device that stitches together vignettes about black family life, educational pursuits, activism, art and friendships. In the world of Topaz Jones, C is for code change and V is for value. It’s perfect for modern TikTok-related attention spans, but that doesn’t mean it lacks substance or soul. On the contrary, it proves that Jones’ ingenuity deserves much more recognition.


Opening for the Moorish Mother and the Irreversible Entanglements
The New Parish, Oakland
February 23

Before the term “hyperpop” entered common vocabulary, Tyler Holmes sang and rapped over his self-produced chaotic, glitchy beats and industrial noise. But over the past two years, the artist has leaned into his singer-songwriter side. Their 2021 album, nightmare in paradise, offers a space to process trauma with stripped-down tracks that combine beautiful acoustic guitars, cellos and woodwinds, delicate vocals and experimental electronics. Holmes wrote it after caring for a friend who was shot and survived a random attack while they were touring Puerto Rico together. Always the one who makes beauty out of tragedy, Holmes makes room for our collective grief.





With spiritual and provocative cramp
DNA Lounge, San Francisco
February 25

There’s something special about the way Kris Esfandiari’s buzzing voice can lull you into peaceful reverie one minute and open you up with rage and catharsis the next. The lead singer of Oakland doom metal band King Woman is one of the most compelling performers of her genre. Her earlier work was rooted in dealing with a religious upbringing which she described as “bigoted”, and on King Woman’s 2021 album, Heavenly Blues, she draws on biblical archetypes to create a gothic drama of her own design. Esfandiari’s involvement in creative scenes and communities outside of metal means his work isn’t just relegated to a niche. She last performed at Bottom of the Hill at Noise Pop 2019 with her other project, Miserable, and with King Woman she takes the lead on a much bigger stage at DNA Lounge.





With Cheflee
The New Parish, Oakland
February 25

In some circles, jazz and hip-hop are in constant dialogue, and Chicago drummer, producer and beat scientist Makaya McCraven is one of the vehicles for this creative conversation. McCraven looks to the past and the future to create new possibilities: just look at his latest album, Decrypt the messagewhere, like a true crate digger in the tradition of J Dilla, he pulls interesting sounds released before the 1960s from the legendary Blue Note Records catalog, mixing them with modern recordings by top instrumentalists in his band and blurring the lines of time and space in the process.





Joe Henderson Lab at SFJAZZ Center, San Francisco
February 25

Valerie Troutt’s big, beautiful voice and high-energy house beats unite in divine synergy: together they can move your body and mind to a brief moment of spiritual enlightenment on the dance floor. The Oakland singer brings gospel-trained skills to the microphone and uses her voice with powerful intent. In addition to self-producing and writing her music, she is a lifelong community activist who uses music as a source of healing and strength, especially for black women.





With Lil Mariko and Death Tour
august room
February 25

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‘Anastasia’, Cascade Festival of African Films, Chelsea Handler: 9 things to do this week https://kmjazz.com/anastasia-cascade-festival-of-african-films-chelsea-handler-9-things-to-do-this-week/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/anastasia-cascade-festival-of-african-films-chelsea-handler-9-things-to-do-this-week/ This week’s lineup of entertainment options includes a plate of fun ladies. Three comical women grace the stage at various venues on Friday. Other options include the annual Cascade Festival of African Films, live jazz music, and “Anastasia,” a Broadway musical based on the 1990s animated film. Remember that COVID-19 mandates requiring indoor masks are […]]]>

This week’s lineup of entertainment options includes a plate of fun ladies. Three comical women grace the stage at various venues on Friday. Other options include the annual Cascade Festival of African Films, live jazz music, and “Anastasia,” a Broadway musical based on the 1990s animated film.

Remember that COVID-19 mandates requiring indoor masks are still in place. Check with venues for COVID-specific safety requirements.

Film taken from “Lingui, the sacred bonds” a work presented at the Cascade Festival of African Films.

Cascade African Film Festival

Portland Community College’s annual Black History Month celebration continues with a series of new films that show Africa through African eyes. The film’s subjects range from the tragic decline of the fishing industry in Senegal to the story of a gang leader who runs a prison in Ivory Coast.

The free festival will be offered virtually again in 2022 but includes four in-person events. All location-specific films offer entry on a first-come, first-served basis with limited capacity to allow for distancing. With the exception of “Lingui, The Sacred Bonds”, all films are also available for online streaming. The screening of the film begins at the time and on the day indicated on the calendar and will remain available until the following Wednesday or until the maximum number of views is reached.

In-person screenings are:

The festival begins on Friday February 4 and continues daily until March 5; donations are appreciated; dev.africanfilmfestival.org

Leanne Morgan

The charming Southern stay-at-home mom combines amusing stories from her own life with everyday sightings in her “Big Panty Tour.” If you have kids, or were ever a kid, you can probably relate.

7 p.m. Friday, February 4, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway; tickets start at $30; portland5.evenue.net

Best A&E Bets

Chelsea manager. Photo by Emily Shur/courtesy Chelsea Handler

Chelsea Handler: Vaccinated and Horny Tour

The prolific comedian, actress, writer, television host and producer is coming to Portland for two shows. The Comedy Central regular hosted “The Chelsea Handler Show” beginning in 2006 on E! network. She also starred in an NBC sitcom, “Are You There, Chelsea?”, which ran for one season and wrote six books that made the New York Times bestseller list.

7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4, Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St.; tickets start at $50; portland5.com

Best A&E Bets

Jazz singer Eugenie Jones. Image courtesy of Walters Arts Center, Hillsboro.

Eugenie Jones

Jazz singer-songwriter Eugenie Jones takes the stage in Hillsboro with a smooth beat and driving tunes that pay homage to Ella Fitzgerald’s repertoire and The Great American Songbook.

7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4, Walters Cultural Arts Center, 527 E. Main St., Hillsboro; tickets $22 on day of show; Hillsboro-Oregon.gov/WaltersConcerts

Miz Cracker: “It’s a women’s tour”

Miz Cracker, New York drag queen and star of Season 5 of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” and “RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars,” brings her brand of gleeful pessimism to the stage for a one-night solo show.

8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4, Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark St.; tickets $30, 21+ only; revolutionhall.com

Best A&E Bets

The Hand2Mouth Youth program presents “The Town of Many Names”.

“The City of Many Names”

Hand2Mouth Theater’s youth program features a digital performance of an original work that explores the “Wild West” of the World Wide Web. Friday night’s performance includes a post-show chat with the cast and creators. The event is part of the Fertile Ground Festival.

7:30 p.m. Friday, February 4, tickets $5 to $15; YouTube link shared at time of ticket purchase; hand2mouththeatre.org

A woman in evening dress takes center stage while a man kneels to her left

Kyla Stone (Anya) and Sam McLellan (Dmitry) star in the Broadway production of “Anastasia” in Portland.Photo by Jeremy Daniel

“Anastasia”

Broadway in Portland takes guests on a journey through the twilight of the 1920s Russian Empire. A young woman, determined to uncover the truth about her past, enlists a dashing con artist and lovable former aristocrat. Terrence McNally’s musical is based on the 1997 animated film of the same name.

Opens at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 8 and continues various dates and times through February 13, Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St.; tickets start at $39.25; BroadwayInPortland.com.

Jeremy Denk

Chamber Music Northwest hosts American pianist Jeremy Denk, winner of a MacArthur Genius Fellowship and the Avery Fisher Prize, in a concert featuring Bach’s “The Well-Tempered Clavier”. The concert at the old church will be recorded and streamed online later in February. Check the website for more information.

Live concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th Ave.; tickets start at $32.50; cmnw.secure.force.com

Best A&E Bets

The Oregon Historical Society is organizing an exhibition of works of art by Frances Stilwell: “Oregon’s Botanical Landscape”.

Frances Stilwell: Oregon Botanical Landscape

The Oregon Historical Society is hosting an exhibit of native plant paintings by former biologist and ethologist Frances Stilwell, who left her scientific career in 1981 to devote herself to creating depictions of Oregon’s native plants. She is also the author of “Oregon’s Botanical Landscape: An Opportunity to Imagine Oregon Before 1800”. View the work daily during museum opening hours until May 1.

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 12 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Ave; free admission for members and Multnomah County residents, $5-$10 for others; ohs.org/museum/visit-the-museum.cfm

One more: Need help navigating the Fertile Ground Festival? We’ve got you covered: oregonlive.com/entertainment

– If you have any live or virtual events you’d like to see highlighted at OregonLive.com or in the weekly print A&E section of The Oregonian, please email your submissions to events@oregonian.com at least three weeks before the start of your event. Digital images or links to videos are helpful.

—Rosemarie Stein events@oregonian.com

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Brighton and Hove News » 100 more performers announced for The Great Escape https://kmjazz.com/brighton-and-hove-news-100-more-performers-announced-for-the-great-escape/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/brighton-and-hove-news-100-more-performers-announced-for-the-great-escape/ The great Escape announcement today Another 100 artists will perform at Brighton Festival this yearfeaturing some of the most exciting names in new music, including Rebecca Black, The Amazons, Court Act, Sinead O’Brien, Baby Queenand much more. The Great Escape, the new music festival, will open the 2022 festival season by welcoming over 450 up-and-coming […]]]>

The great Escape announcement today Another 100 artists will perform at Brighton Festival this yearfeaturing some of the most exciting names in new music, including Rebecca Black, The Amazons, Court Act, Sinead O’Brien, Baby Queenand much more.

The Great Escape, the new music festival, will open the 2022 festival season by welcoming over 450 up-and-coming artists and trending talents at over 35 venues within walking distancealongside the music industry-led TGE conference, May 12-14, 2022 in Brighton.

Tickets for The Great Escape festival start from £75 and are on sale HERE.

Court Act

From the UK, live return of the American queer hyperpop artist Rebecca Blackto rock Reading’s riffs and licks The Amazons, The Great Escape 2022 lineup champions upcoming talent from a wide variety of genres. Artists announced include the Gen Z grunge pop singer Baby Queenobservational and acerbic post punk from Leeds Court Actpost punk poet Sinead O’BrienTikTok star turned solo musician Abby RobertScottish singer-songwriter Dylan Fraserrising star Lola YoungAmerican singer-songwriter Indigo De SouzaLiverpool alternative rockers Crawlersirish rapper malakiBelfast post-punk rockers Enola Gayand folk-rock singer-songwriter Madison Cunningham.

Indigo De Souza

Additionally, The Great Escape is also announcing today the highly anticipated return of The road to the great escape, the showcase for live music in Glasgow and Dublin in the days leading up to The Great Escape new music festival and conference in Brighton. Kicking off in Glasgow on May 6 and 7, then heading to Dublin on May 9 and 10, The Road To The Great Escape will bring some of the most exciting new talent from TGE 2022 to Scotland and Ireland, with artists appearing in both locations. , including in Dublin. singer-songwriter Abi Coulibaly, South London producer and multi-instrumentalist Conor Albert, Scottish alt-pop lyricist Dylan Fraser, Hawaiian tropical soul artist Eli Smart, Leeds alt-rock four-piece English teacher, talent chamber pop from Sheffield Frankie Beetlestone, South London trio Honeyglaze, Tamil-Swiss R&B musician Priya Ragu, Australian indie pop singer-songwriter Sycco and LA indie-pop artist Wallice.

The objective

The Garage, King Tuts, G2 and The Garage’s Attic Bar in Glasgow will also exclusively host rising Scottish soul singer Brooke Combe, spiritually exploratory Birmingham artist Sipho and upcoming acts such as Swim School, Bonnie Kemplay, Vlure, Taahliah and Alex Amor. while Dublin’s Whelan’s, Workman’s Club, Grand Social and Academy 2 will see Dublin-born singer-songwriter Lucy McWilliams and collaborating rapper Malaki perform exclusively alongside artists such as Kynsy, Sainte, Seb, Sprints and The Clockworks. Tickets on sale HERE.

Joe and the shitboys

Making its much-anticipated return to the festival schedule after a two-year hiatus, The Great Escape is firmly established and recognized as the festival for new music, and will be announcing additional artists on the lineup, along with additional information on the music Industry-led TGE Conference coming soon.

coach party

FOLK / AMERICAN / COUNTRY

GRACE CUMMINGS | KATHRYN JOSEPH | SMALL BARS | MARGO CILKER | NATIVE HARROW | THE UNIVERSE OF BOBBY NET

Folk, country and Americana fans can expect to enjoy performances from some of the genre’s most exciting new talent from around the world, including the Melbourne-based bluesy folk singer-songwriter. Grace CummingsAustralia’s high-energy indie folk family trio small quirksScottish singer-songwriter and musician Catherine JosephAmerican country-rock storyteller Margo CilkerPennsylvania folk duo native harrow and mysterious American crooner The Bobby Tenderloin universe.

Grove

GRIME / RAP / HIP-HOP

TIGER BALM | grove | HMD | MALAKI | NEONE THE WONDERFUL | NUTRIBE

The Great Escape also looks forward to hosting sets from some of the hottest new artists in grime, rap and hip-hop, with an undoubtedly uncompromising live performance from the Bristol-based queer producer and singer. Grovea unique blend of hip-hop and R&B from the Somali/Mancunian rapper HMDpowerful lyrics and raps from the rising talent of Irish hip-hop malakiWolverhampton self-exploratory rap fusion NeOne the Wonderfulhip-hop, K-pop, rap fusion of Seoul-based alternative K-pop Tiger Balmand a vibrant and highly entertaining performance by the Liverpool trio nutribe.

Balimaya Project

JAZZ / R&B / SOUL

BALIMAYA PROJECT | BUDJERAH | DOWNTOWN KAYOTO | IRIS GOLD | CHILDREN | LOLA YOUNG | LUCY MCWILLIAMS | MADI SASKIA | BRAND CAKE | SHAKIRA ALLEYNE | TAMZENE

For festival-goers looking for soulful sounds, R&B grooves or jazz beats, The Great Escape 2022 lineup features the eclectic Mandé jazz fusion from the 16-piece London-based collective Balimaya ProjectAustralian singer-songwriter’s dreamlike R&B and gospel roots Budjerahalternative R&B artist born in Zimbabwe and raised in Hull Downtown Kayotovulnerable and personal lyricism of rising star and voice of John Lewis Christmas 2021 advert Lola Youngsinger-songwriter’s enchanting pop soul Irises GoldCardiff’s Experimental R&B Kiddusand emerging Irish singer-songwriter Lucy McWilliams. Smooth Birmingham singer Madi Saskiajazz producer and multi-instrumentalist brand cakeLondon experimental composer Shakira Alleyneand Scottish contemporary soul singer-songwriter Tamzene are also confirmed.

Rebecca Black

POP / DANCE

BABY QUEEN | COCO AND THE LOST | EWAN MAINWOOD | ANONYMOUS JOY | ELLIOT KINGS | LOKOY | MICKEY CALLISTO | PIRI & TOMMY | REBECCA BLACK | SOFI | TAAHLIAH

The Great Escape is set to welcome a host of upcoming talent for pop and dance music fans, including the American pop singer Rebecca Blackthe former teenage viral sensation behind the YouTube hit “Friday” is now an evolved queer hyperpop artist, sharp observations and witty lyrics from the Gen Z grunge-pop favorite Baby QueenBritpop melodies and grunge guitar riffs from Coco and the LostLeeds-based singer-songwriter Ewain MainwoodSouth London production duo Joy Anonymousmelancholic pop from the British-Swiss singer-songwriter Kings ElliotLasse Lokøy’s solo project from Sløtface Lokoyliverpool mickey callixto and its synth-tinged melodies, DIY dance duo and TikTok success story piri and tommyindie pop bops from Leicester SOFIand Glasgow-based DJ/producer Taahliah.

Honey glaze

ALT / INDIA

ABBY ROBERT | ALEX LOVE | AZUR RYDER | BLAIR DAVIE | BLEACHING LABORATORY | BONNIE KEMPLAY | BRYAN’S MAGIC TEARS | CHRISTIAN LEE HUTSON | CAT BURNS | COACH EVENING | DYLAN FRASER | ELI SMART | ENGLISH TEACHER | FITZROY HOLT | FRANKIE BEETLESTONE | HONEY GLAZE | ILLUMINATI HOTTIES | INDIGO DE SOUZA | KATHLEEN FRANCES | KATY J PEARSON | KYNS | LOCK | MADISON CUNNINGHAM | MATERIAL | MEGAN WYN | PHOEBE GREEN | PIXEY | PLUM | PORCHES | PORTRON PORTRON LOPEZ | PRIMA QUEEN | SAD BOYS CLUB | SINEAD O’BRIEN | SWIMMING SCHOOL | TEAM PICTURE | THE GOA EXPRESS | LET GO | SHAKES | TOMMY LEFROY | ULTRA-Q | VALUE | COURT ACT

Indie and alternative fans can expect a huge selection of the latest bands, including the TikTok star turned solo musician Abby RobertLos Angeles-based singer-songwriter Christian Lee Hutsonunique songwriter and musician in Scotland Dylan FraserAmerican indie rockers Illuminati hottiesand singer-songwriters Indigo De Souza, Madison Cunninghamand Mattiel. Quirky singer from Manchester Phoebe GreenIrish post-punk poet Sinead O’Briencalifornia quartet Ultra Qand the rapidly rising post-punk feel of Leeds Court Act are also set to perform alongside Alex Love, Bonnie Kemplay, Blair Davie, Bleaching laboratory, Bryan’s magic tears, Cat burns, coach party, Eli Smart, English teacher, Fitzroy Holt, Frankie Beetlestone, Honey glaze, Catherine Frances, Katy J Pearson, Kynsey, Locking, Megan Wynn, pixely, Feather, porches, Portron Portron Lopez, PRIME QUEEN, sad boys club, swimming school, Team picture, THE GOA EXPRESS, Letting go, The tremors, Tommy Lefroyand VALUE.

The Amazons

PUNK / ROCK / METAL

BAD WAITRESS | BANKS ARCADE | Crawlers | DEAD PONY | ENOLA GAY | GEN & THE DEGENERATE | JOE AND THE SHITBOYS | THE OBJECTIVE | MEMES | PANIC CABIN | PORCH | PUTYFACE | ROLA | SOFTCULT | SPRINTS | AMAZONS | THE BYKER GROVE FAN CLUB | VALVES

For those looking for heavier licks, The Great Escape has announced the addition of Reading Fourpiece the Amazonswho are no doubt about to perform the rock anthems from their two Top Ten albums, the anxious punk art of Toronto’s bad waitressMelbourne-based bands, the modern heavy quintet Banks ArcadeLiverpool alternative rockers Crawlers and rioting rock’n’rollers Gen & The degenerateScottish post punk quartet dead ponyFour post-punk pieces from Belfast Enola GayFaroese queer vegan ‘shitpunk’ Joe and the shitboysthe dark punks of leeds The objectiveloud post-punk duo from Glasgow MemesWelsh DIY punk band Panic Shackbrighton newcomers PorchCalifornian singer-songwriter Voisey pouty faceand Manchester rock n roll five pieces rolle. Plus the Canadian grunge-pop scuzz twins softcultDublin’s raucous and loud quartet Sprintsthreesome ‘post macho noise pop’ The Byker Grove Fan Cluband Australian indie rockers The Vanns have been added to the line-up.

Buy your tickets for The Great Escape HERE.

greatescapefestival.com

Event flyer – double click to enlarge!

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A music festival will fill the historic Episcopal Church of Christ in Covington this weekend | St. Tammany Community News https://kmjazz.com/a-music-festival-will-fill-the-historic-episcopal-church-of-christ-in-covington-this-weekend-st-tammany-community-news/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 12:15:00 +0000 https://kmjazz.com/a-music-festival-will-fill-the-historic-episcopal-church-of-christ-in-covington-this-weekend-st-tammany-community-news/ A long weekend of music and special masses will take over Christ’s Episcopal Church from January 21-23 as the historic downtown Covington church presents its seventh annual Jazz Festival in January, sponsored by private donors and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. There will be three ticketed musical acts on Friday night and three […]]]>

A long weekend of music and special masses will take over Christ’s Episcopal Church from January 21-23 as the historic downtown Covington church presents its seventh annual Jazz Festival in January, sponsored by private donors and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

There will be three ticketed musical acts on Friday night and three more on Saturday night, plus three special “Shower the People” musical masses on January 23 featuring the 70s sounds of James Taylor, Paul Simon, Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon and more.

Masses, of course, are free. Advance concert tickets for Friday or Saturday are $40 a night or a weekend package for $75; more at the door. Buy them online at www.jazzinjanuary.org or in person weekdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Church Administration Building, 129 N. New Hampshire Ave., near downtown Covington.

The festival was started seven years ago by the Reverend Bill Miller, the church’s former rector.

This year, award-winning artist Nellie McKay, Baton Rouge band Minos the Saint and local singer/songwriter Aaron Maras kick off the festival with performances on Friday night. McKay mixes several genres, including vintage jazz, vocal pop and hip-hop, to create his signature eclectic sound.

A weekly guide to the biggest news in St. Tammany. Register today.

Minos the Saint is not a “traditional” band from South Louisiana. Instead, the ensemble plays mostly original music, reflecting a variety of influences that produce experimental, yet accessible, original folk-rock that uniquely represents Louisiana and the world.

Saturday night’s triple draft includes Abita Springs’ Cactus Thief and Jazz-in-January returning artists Handmade Moments and Jon Cleary and The Absolute Monster Gentlemen.

Grammy-winning Cleary has released numerous albums over the years and performed with some of the city’s most legendary R&B artists, including Earl “Trick Bag” King and Snooks Eaglin. Cleary and his band, The Absolute Monster Gentlemen, will bring their unique brand of funk and R&B to the audience.

Cactus Thief was formed in 2016 around the songs of bandleader Aaron Maras. The group mixes rock ‘n’ roll, gospel, country and traditional Cajun music to create folk music with a modern sound.

New Orleans band Handmade Moments features multi-instrumentalist duo Anna Moss and Joel Ludford who bring rock, jazz, folk and Southern roots together in one big pot of musical stew that is their latest record, Paw Paw Tree.

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